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The impact of workplace policies and other social factors on self-reported influenza-like illness incidence during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic

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  • Kumar, S.
  • Quinn, S.C.
  • Kim, K.H.
  • Daniel, L.H.
  • Freimuth, V.S.

Abstract

We assessed the impact of social determinants of potential exposure to H1N1-which are unequally distributed by race/ethnicity in the United States-on incidence of influenza-like illness (ILI) during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Methods. In January 2010 we surveyed a nationally representative sample (n=2079) of US adults from the Knowledge Networks online research panel, with Hispanic and African American oversamples. The completion rate was 56%. Results. Path analysis examining ILI incidence, race, and social determinants of potential exposure to H1N1 demonstrated that higher ILI incidence was related to workplace policies, such as lack of access to sick leave, and structural factors, such as number of children in the household. Hispanic ethnicity was related to a greater risk of ILI attributable to these social determinants, even after we controlled for income and education. Conclusions. The absence of certain workplace policies, such as paid sick leave, confers a population-attributable risk of 5 million additional cases of ILI in the general population and 1.2 million cases among Hispanics. Federal mandates for sick leave could have significant health impacts by reducing morbidity from ILI, especially in Hispanics.

Suggested Citation

  • Kumar, S. & Quinn, S.C. & Kim, K.H. & Daniel, L.H. & Freimuth, V.S., 2012. "The impact of workplace policies and other social factors on self-reported influenza-like illness incidence during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 102(1), pages 134-140.
  • Handle: RePEc:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2011.300307_9
    DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2011.300307
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    Cited by:

    1. Krista Ruffini & Aaron Sojourner & Abigail Wozniak, 2021. "Who'S In And Who'S Out Under Workplace Covid Symptom Screening?," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 40(2), pages 614-641, March.
    2. Zesen Qian & Lingran Yuan & Shuo Wang & Qizheng Zhang & Binlei Gong, 2021. "Epidemics, Convergence, and Common Prosperity: Evidence from China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 29(6), pages 117-138, November.
    3. Toxvaerd, F.M.O, 2020. "Equilibrium Social Distancing," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 2021, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
    4. Fenichel, Eli P., 2013. "Economic considerations for social distancing and behavioral based policies during an epidemic," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 440-451.
    5. Naomi J Anderson & David K Bonauto & Z Joyce Fan & June T Spector, 2012. "Distribution of Influenza-Like Illness (ILI) by Occupation in Washington State, September 2009–August 2010," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 7(11), pages 1-10, November.
    6. James L. Doti, 2021. "Examining the impact of socioeconomic variables on COVID-19 death rates at the state level," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 15-53, April.

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