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Effects of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign on youths

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  • Hornik, R.
  • Jacobsohn, L.
  • Orwin, R.
  • Piesse, A.
  • Kalton, G.

Abstract

Objectives. We examined the cognitive and behavioral effects of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign on youths aged 12.5 to 18 years and report core evaluation results. Methods. From September 1999 to June 2004, 3 nationally representative cohorts of US youths aged 9 to 18 years were surveyed at home 4 times. Sample size ranged from 8117 in the first to 5126 in the fourth round (65% first-round response rate, with 86%-93% of still eligible youths interviewed subsequently). Main outcomes were self-reported lifetime, past-year, and past-30-day marijuana use and related cognitions. Results. Most analyses showed no effects from the campaign. At one round, however, more ad exposure predicted less intention to avoid marijuana use (γ= -0.07; 95% confidence interval [CI]=-0.13, -0.01) and weaker antidrug social norms (γ=-0.05; 95% CI=-0.08, -0.02) at the subsequent round. Exposure at round 3 predicted marijuana initiation at round 4 (γ=0.11; 95% CI=0.00, 0.22). Conclusions. Through June 2004, the campaign is unlikely to have had favorable effects on youths and may have had delayed unfavorable effects. The evaluation challenges the usefulness of the campaign.

Suggested Citation

  • Hornik, R. & Jacobsohn, L. & Orwin, R. & Piesse, A. & Kalton, G., 2008. "Effects of the National Youth Anti-Drug Media Campaign on youths," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 98(12), pages 2229-2236.
  • Handle: RePEc:aph:ajpbhl:10.2105/ajph.2007.125849_2
    DOI: 10.2105/AJPH.2007.125849
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    Cited by:

    1. Monic Sun & Xiaoquan (Michael) Zhang & Feng Zhu, 2019. "U-Shaped Conformity in Online Social Networks," Marketing Science, INFORMS, vol. 38(3), pages 461-480, May.
    2. Niko de Silva & Benno Torgler, 2011. "Smoke Signals and Mixed Messages: Medical Marijuana & Drug Policy Signalling Effects," CREMA Working Paper Series 2011-18, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    3. Mason, Marlys J. & Tanner, John F. & Piacentini, Maria & Freeman, Dan & Anastasia, Trena & Batat, Wided & Boland, Wendy & Canbulut, Murad & Drenten, Jenna & Hamby, Anne & Rangan, Priyam & Yang, Zhiyon, 2013. "Advancing a participatory approach for youth risk behavior: Foundations, distinctions, and research directions," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(8), pages 1235-1241.
    4. Anderson, D. Mark, 2010. "Does information matter? The effect of the Meth Project on meth use among youths," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 29(5), pages 732-742, September.
    5. Mancini, Christina & Shields, Ryan T., 2014. "Notes on a (sex crime) scandal: The impact of media coverage of sexual abuse in the Catholic Church on public opinion," Journal of Criminal Justice, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 221-232.
    6. Hiromu Nishiuchi & Masataka Taguri & Yoshiki Ishikawa, 2016. "Using a Marginal Structural Model to Design a Theory-Based Mass Media Campaign," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 11(7), pages 1-12, July.
    7. Niko de Silva & Benno Torgler, 2011. "Smoke Signals and Mixed Messages: Medical Marijuana & Drug Policy Signalling Effects," CREMA Working Paper Series 2011-18, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).

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