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A Review of the Socio-Economic Analysis of Soil Degradation Problems for Developed and Developing Countries

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  • Thampapillai, Dodo J.
  • Anderson, Jock R.

Abstract

In this paper, the main socio-economic concepts and their applications in the study of soil degradation are reviewed under three broad headings: soil conservation as an input in agricultural production; topsoil as a natural resource somewhere between being renewable and nonrenewable; and the effects of dealing with common property resources. The treatment of soil conservation as an input has involved the demonstration of damage functions and a study of factors influencing the adoption of soil conservation. The study of renewability, or the lack of it, has involved the application of the concept of user costs, whilst the consideration of common property resources has concentrated on the need to minimise the divergences between social and private values. The literature is dominated by work on developed countries and also reveals the research on decision frameworks to be compartmentalised in terms of the three concepts.

Suggested Citation

  • Thampapillai, Dodo J. & Anderson, Jock R., 1994. "A Review of the Socio-Economic Analysis of Soil Degradation Problems for Developed and Developing Countries," Review of Marketing and Agricultural Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 62(03), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:remaae:12318
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Boris E. Bravo-Ureta & Horacio Cocchi & Daniel Solís, 2006. "Adoption of Soil Conservation Technologies in El Salvador: A Cross-Section and Over-Time Analysis," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 2894, Inter-American Development Bank.
    2. Shuhao, Tan, 2009. "Impact of Land Institutional Factors on Farm Management and Soil Quality," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51662, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. Boris Bravo & Horacio Cocchi & Daniel Solís, 2006. "Adoption of Soil Conservation Technologies in El Salvador: A cross-Section and Over-Time Analysis," OVE Working Papers 1806, Inter-American Development Bank, Office of Evaluation and Oversight (OVE).
    4. Ananda, Jayanath & Herath, Gamini & Chisholm, Anthony H., 2001. "Determination of yield and erosion damage functions using subjectively elicited data: application to smallholder tea in Sri Lanka," Australian Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Australian Agricultural and Resource Economics Society, vol. 45(2), June.
    5. Böhm, Nicole, 2002. "Desertifikation: zu den Schwierigkeiten der Implementation der UN-Konvention Fallstudie Nambia," Discussion Papers, Research Professorship Environmental Policy FS II 02-407, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
    6. Cocchi, Horacio & Bravo-Ureta, Boris E. & Quiroga, Ricardo E., 2004. "Farm Benefits And Natural Resource Projects In Honduras And El Salvador," 2004 Annual meeting, August 1-4, Denver, CO 20328, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Land Economics/Use;

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