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Impacts Of Financial Characteristics And The Boom-Bust Cycle On The Farm Inventory-Cash Flow Relationship


  • Bierlen, Ralph W.
  • Ahrendsen, Bruce L.
  • Dixon, Bruce L.


The sensitivity of farm inventory investment to movements in cash flow is tested. Inventories should be sensitive to shifts in cash flow because inventory investment is readily reversible and inventories are a significant portion of assets. Investment models estimated with Kansas farm panel data indicate that: (a) farms absorb internal finance shocks by adjusting inventories, (b) the inventory investment of livestock and high-debt farms are more sensitive to movements in cash flow than crop and low-debt farms, and (c) inventory investment is more sensitive to cash flow during the 1981-86 bust and the 1987-92 recovery than during the 1975-80 boom.

Suggested Citation

  • Bierlen, Ralph W. & Ahrendsen, Bruce L. & Dixon, Bruce L., 1998. "Impacts Of Financial Characteristics And The Boom-Bust Cycle On The Farm Inventory-Cash Flow Relationship," Journal of Agricultural and Applied Economics, Southern Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 30(02), December.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:joaaec:15560

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Gilchrist, Simon & Himmelberg, Charles P., 1995. "Evidence on the role of cash flow for investment," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(3), pages 541-572, December.
    2. Robert E. Carpenter & Steven M. Fazzari & Bruce C. Petersen, 1994. "Inventory Investment, Internal-Finance Fluctuation, and the Business Cycle," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 25(2), pages 75-138.
    3. Randal R. Rucker & Oscar R. Burt & Jeffrey T. LaFrance, 1984. "An Econometric Model of Cattle Inventories," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 66(2), pages 131-144.
    4. Steven M. Fazzari & R. Glenn Hubbard & Bruce C. Petersen, 1988. "Financing Constraints and Corporate Investment," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 19(1), pages 141-206.
    5. Chamberlain, Gary, 1984. "Panel data," Handbook of Econometrics,in: Z. Griliches† & M. D. Intriligator (ed.), Handbook of Econometrics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 22, pages 1247-1318 Elsevier.
    6. Takeo Hoshi & Anil Kashyap & David Scharfstein, 1991. "Corporate Structure, Liquidity, and Investment: Evidence from Japanese Industrial Groups," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(1), pages 33-60.
    7. Alan S. Blinder & Louis J. Maccini, 1991. "Taking Stock: A Critical Assessment of Recent Research on Inventories," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 73-96, Winter.
    8. Charles W. Calomiris & R. Glenn Hubbard & James H. Stock, 1986. "The Farm Debt Crisis and Public Policy," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 17(2), pages 441-486.
    9. Kevin L. Kliesen & R. Alton Gilbert, 1996. "Are some agricultural banks too agricultural?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Jan, pages 23-36.
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    Cited by:

    1. Chul-Woo Kwon & Peter F. Orazem & Daniel M. Otto, 2006. "Off-farm labor supply responses to permanent and transitory farm income," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 34(1), pages 59-67, January.
    2. Lefebvre, Marianne & Gomez y Paloma, Sergio & Viaggi, Davide, 2014. "EU farmers' intentions to invest in 2014-2020: complementarity between asset classes," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182737, European Association of Agricultural Economists.


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