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Media Coverage Of Agrobiotechnology: Did The Butterfly Have An Effect?

Author

Listed:
  • Marks, Leonie A.
  • Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas G.
  • Allison, Kevin
  • Zakharova, Ludmila

Abstract

This study examines media coverage of genetically modified (GM) crops in a risk communication framework. Content analysis is employed to investigate how specific environmental, food safety, and landmark events, such as the monarch butterfly and Pusztai controversies, and the cloning of Dolly-the-sheep, were reported by the media. Media coverage is from United Kingdom and United States newspapers over the period 1990 through 2001. On balance, findings show that the UK press has been more negative than the U.S. press in its coverage of GM crops. In addition, environmental and food safety events had a significant impact on the level and cycle of GM crop coverage.

Suggested Citation

  • Marks, Leonie A. & Kalaitzandonakes, Nicholas G. & Allison, Kevin & Zakharova, Ludmila, 2003. "Media Coverage Of Agrobiotechnology: Did The Butterfly Have An Effect?," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 21(1).
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:jloagb:14674
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kym Anderson & Gordon Rausser & Johan Swinnen, 2013. "Political Economy of Public Policies: Insights from Distortions to Agricultural and Food Markets," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 51(2), pages 423-477, June.
    2. McFadden, Brandon R. & Lusk, Jayson L., 2013. "Effects of Cost and Campaign Advertising on Support for California’s Proposition 37," Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, Western Agricultural Economics Association, vol. 38(2), August.
    3. Ventura, Vera & Frisio, Dario G., 2015. "How scary! An analysis of visual communication concerning genetically modified organisms in Italy," 2015 International European Forum, February 17-21, 2014, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 206247, International European Forum on Innovation and System Dynamics in Food Networks.
    4. Ventura, Vera & Frisio, Dario G. & Ferrazzi, Giovanni, 2015. "How Scary! An analysis of visual communication concerning genetically modified organisms in Italy," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211921, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Ventura, Vera & Frisio, Dario G., 2015. "How scary! An analysis of visual communication concerning genetically modified organisms in Italy," 144th Seminar, February 9-13, 2015, Innsbruck-Igls, Austria 206247, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Miljkovic, Dragan & Mostad, Daniel, 2005. "Impact of Changes in Dietary Preferences on U.S. Retail Demand for Beef: Health Concerns and the Role of Media," Journal of Agribusiness, Agricultural Economics Association of Georgia, vol. 23(2).
    7. Peake, Whitney O. & Detre, Joshua D. & Carlson, Clinton C., 2014. "One bad apple spoils the bunch? An exploration of broad consumption changes in response to food recalls," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 49(P1), pages 13-22.
    8. repec:spr:scient:v:72:y:2007:i:3:d:10.1007_s11192-007-1769-2 is not listed on IDEAS

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