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The Impact of Catfish Imports on the U.S. Wholesale and Farm Sectors

Author

Listed:
  • Muhammad, Andrew
  • Neal, Sammy J.
  • Hanson, Terrill R.
  • Jones, Keithly G.

Abstract

The primary objective of this study was to assess the impact of catfish imports and tariffs on the U.S. catfish industry, with particular focus on the U.S. International Trade Commission ruling on Vietnam in 2003. Given the importance of Vietnam to the U.S. catfish market, it was assumed that catfish import prices would increase by 35 percent if the maximum tariff was imposed on catfish from Vietnam. With the tariff, domestic catfish prices at the wholesale level would increase by $0.06 per lb, and farm prices by $0.03 per lb. Processor sales would increase by 1.66 percent. Total welfare at the wholesale level would increase from $69.2 million to $71.7 million, an increase of about 3.63 percent, and processor and farm revenue would increase by 4.4 percent and 5.8 percent, respectively. These results represent the greatest possible benefit and suggest modest gains for the U.S. catfish industry.

Suggested Citation

  • Muhammad, Andrew & Neal, Sammy J. & Hanson, Terrill R. & Jones, Keithly G., 2010. "The Impact of Catfish Imports on the U.S. Wholesale and Farm Sectors," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 39(3), October.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:arerjl:95587
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    Cited by:

    1. Kehar Singh & Madan M. Dey & Prasanna Surathkal, 2014. "Seasonal and Spatial Variations in Demand for and Elasticities of Fish Products in the United States: An Analysis Based on Market-Level Scanner Data," Canadian Journal of Agricultural Economics/Revue canadienne d'agroeconomie, Canadian Agricultural Economics Society/Societe canadienne d'agroeconomie, vol. 62(3), pages 343-363, September.
    2. Asche, Frank & Zhang, Dengjun, 2013. "Testing Structural Changes in the U.S. Whitefish Import Market: An Inverse Demand System Approach," Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association, vol. 42(3), December.
    3. Chen, Xuan & Scuderi, Ben, 2016. "Assessing the Market Integration of Domestic and Imported Catfish in the U.S," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235550, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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