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The impact of smallholder commercialisation of organic crops on food consumption patterns, dietary diversity and consumption elasticities

Author

Listed:
  • Hendriks, Sheryl L.
  • Msaki, Mark M.

Abstract

The impact of smallholder commercialisation on food consumption patterns in a rural community of South Africa was investigated. The dietary diversity, nutrient intakes and consumption patterns of certified, partially certified and non-members of an organic farmers’ organisation were compared. Engagement in certified commercial organic farming promoted comparatively greater dietary diversity and improved nutrient intakes. While smallholder agriculture commercialisation has the potential to improve food consumption patterns and food quality through increased income and labour opportunities, caution should be exercised before claiming that such commercialisation can alleviate food insecurity and solve hunger in rural South Africa.

Suggested Citation

  • Hendriks, Sheryl L. & Msaki, Mark M., 2009. "The impact of smallholder commercialisation of organic crops on food consumption patterns, dietary diversity and consumption elasticities," Agrekon, Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA), vol. 48(2), June.
  • Handle: RePEc:ags:agreko:53383
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    File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53383
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    1. repec:spr:agfoec:v:5:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1186_s40100-017-0076-y is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda & Kulhgatz, Christian H., "undated". "Child Malnutrition, Agricultural Diversification and Commercialization among Smallholder Farmers in Eastern Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 198189, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    3. Kuhlgatz, Christian & Mofya-Mukuka, Rhoda, 2015. "Agricultural Commercialization and Child Nutrition: Lessons from the Eastern Province of Zambia," Food Security Collaborative Policy Briefs 208578, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    4. Ogunniyi Adebayo & Kehinde Olagunju & Salman K. Kabir & Ogundipe Adeyemi, 2016. "Social Crisis, Terrorism and Food Poverty Dynamics: Evidence from Northern Nigeria," International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues, Econjournals, vol. 6(4), pages 1865-1872.
    5. Stephen Shisanya & Paramu Mafongoya, 2016. "Adaptation to climate change and the impacts on household food security among rural farmers in uMzinyathi District of Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(3), pages 597-608, June.
    6. Daniel Tobin & Mark Brennan & Rama Radhakrishna, 2016. "Food access and pro-poor value chains: a community case study in the central highlands of Peru," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 33(4), pages 895-909, December.
    7. Greenwell C MATCHAYA & Pius CHILONDA, 2012. "Estimating Effects Of Constraints On Food Security In Malawi: Policy Lessons From Regressions Quantiles," Applied Econometrics and International Development, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 12(2).

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