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Poverty–Lack of Access to Adequate Safe Water Nexus: Evidence from Rural Malawi

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  • Maxwell Mkondiwa
  • Charles B.L. Jumbe
  • Kenneth A. Wiyo

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between poverty and lack of access to adequate safe water in rural Malawi. Data used in the analysis was collected from a survey covering 1,651 randomly selected households. We use Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA) as a distinct technique for understanding the poverty–rural water access nexus. CCA results indicate that poverty in the context of low income and expenditure is positively correlated with lack of access to safe and adequate water. Integrated Rural Water Resources Management (IRWM) interventions are therefore needed to address both challenges of poverty and poor access to adequate safe water in rural Malawi.

Suggested Citation

  • Maxwell Mkondiwa & Charles B.L. Jumbe & Kenneth A. Wiyo, 2013. "Poverty–Lack of Access to Adequate Safe Water Nexus: Evidence from Rural Malawi," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 25(4), pages 537-550.
  • Handle: RePEc:adb:adbadr:2092
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    1. Youssouf Kiendrebeogo, 2012. "Access to Improved Water Sources and Rural Productivity: Analytical Framework and Cross-country Evidence," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 24(2), pages 153-166.
    2. André Sapir & François Bourguignon & Boris Pleskovic, 2005. "Annual World Bank Conference on development economics: Europe :are we on track to achieve the millennium development goals?," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/8348, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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    Cited by:

    1. Asongu, Simplice, 2015. "Rational Asymmetric Development: Transfer Mispricing and Sub-Saharan Africa’s Extreme Poverty Tragedy," MPRA Paper 71175, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Sosson Tadadjeu & Henri Njangang & Paul Ningaye & Mohammadou Nourou, 2022. "Oil dependence and access to water and sanitation in African countries: Does the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative matter?," African Development Review, African Development Bank, vol. 34(1), pages 54-67, March.
    3. AMAGHOUSS, Jabrane & IBOURK, Aomar, 2020. "Socio-Economic Determinants Of The Prevalence Of Disability In Morocco: Empirical Evidence From Spatial Data," Regional and Sectoral Economic Studies, Euro-American Association of Economic Development, vol. 20(2), pages 79-96.
    4. repec:fan:ecaqec:v:html10.3280/ecag2022oa12375 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Simplice A. Asongu, 2015. "Rational Asymmetric Development: Transfer Mispricing and Sub-Saharan Africa’s Extreme Poverty Tragedy," Research Africa Network Working Papers 15/054, Research Africa Network (RAN).

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