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The changing gender gap across the wage distribution in the UK

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  • Fitzenberger, Bernd
  • Wunderlich, Gaby

Abstract

This paper contributes descriptive evidence on the development of the gender wage gap for different skill groups and full- and part-time employees in the U.K. The empirical analysis is based upon the General Household Survey from 1975 to 1995 and therefore provides evidence on an exceptionally long period. Our focus is not to provide a causal examination. We rather attempt to identify the macroeconomic trends of wages apart from life cycle and cohort effects implementing a model which takes into account the impact of age, time, and birth cohort simultaneously. Moreover, quantile regression is used to distinguish between various points of the entire wage distribution. We conclude that the wage gap between full-time employed females and full-time employed males has closed considerably during the observation period. The gap has closed mostly in the lower part of the wage distribution. In contrast, part-time employed women did not catch up relative to full-time employed men. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research in its series ZEW Discussion Papers with number 01-56.

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Date of creation: 2001
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:zewdip:5412

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Related research

Keywords: Gender Wage Gap; Quantile Regression; Cohort Analysis;

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References

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  1. Alan Manning & Helen Robinson, 1998. "Something in the way She Movcs: A Fresh Look at an Old Gap," CEP Discussion Papers dp0389, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  2. Blau, Francine D & Kahn, Lawrence M, 1996. "Wage Structure and Gender Earnings Differentials: An International Comparison," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 63(250), pages S29-62, Suppl..
  3. Alan Manning, 1998. "Movin On Up: Interpreting the Earnings Experience Profile," CEP Discussion Papers dp0380, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Fitzenberger, Bernd & Wunderlich, Gaby, 2000. "Gender wage differences in West Germany: a cohort analysis," ZEW Discussion Papers 00-48, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  5. Ermisch, John F & Wright, Robert E, 1988. "Gender Discrimination in the British Labour Market: A Reassessment," CEPR Discussion Papers 278, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Reinhard Hujer & Bernd Fitzenberger & Reinhold Schnabel & Thomas E. MaCurdy, 2001. "Testing for uniform wage trends in West-Germany: A cohort analysis using quantile regressions for censored data," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 26(1), pages 41-86.
  7. Gregg, Paul & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 2000. "Mind the Gap, Please: The Changing Nature of Entry Jobs in Britain," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 67(268), pages 499-524, November.
  8. Susan Harkness, 1996. "The gender earnings gap: evidence from the UK," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 17(2), pages 1-36, May.
  9. Gosling, Amanda & Machin, Stephen & Meghir, Costas, 2000. "The Changing Distribution of Male Wages in the U.K," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 67(4), pages 635-66, October.
  10. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-42, June.
  11. John F. Ermisch & Robert E. Wright, 1993. "Wage Offers and Full-Time and Part-Time Employment by British Women," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 28(1), pages 111-133.
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Cited by:
  1. Albrecht, James & van Vuuren, Aico & Vroman, Susan, 2004. "Decomposing the Gender Wage Gap in the Netherlands with Sample Selection Adjustments," IZA Discussion Papers 1400, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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