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Measuring Benefits, Tracing Distributional Effects, and Affecting Distributional Outcomes

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  • Elio H Londero

    (Inter-American Development Bank)

Abstract

This paper shows the differences between how benefits are estimated and how they are distributed, calls attention to the policy variables that are crucial in explaining certain distributional outcomes, explores the importance of looking at the demand for characteristics when trying to benefit the poor, and suggests areas for research.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/pe/papers/0407/0407011.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Public Economics with number 0407011.

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Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: 21 Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwppe:0407011

Note: Type of Document - pdf; pages: 24
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: cost-benefit; poverty; distribution; distributional effects; project; project analysis; project appraisal; project evaluation;

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References

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  1. Kathy J. Hayes & Lori L. Taylor, 1996. "Neighborhood school characteristics: what signals quality to homebuyers?," Economic and Financial Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, issue Q IV, pages 2-9.
  2. Wildasin, David E, 1988. "Indirect Distributional Effects in Benefit-Cost Analysis of Small Projects," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 98(392), pages 801-07, September.
  3. Dani Rodrik, 1995. "Why is there Multilateral Lending?," NBER Working Papers 5160, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Sandra E. Black, 1997. "Do better schools matter? Parental valuation of elementary education," Research Paper 9729, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  5. Richard Voith, 1996. "The suburban housing market: effects of city and suburban employment growth," Working Papers 96-15, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  6. Katharine L. Bradbury, 1997. "Property tax limits and local fiscal behavior: did Massachusetts cities and towns spend too little on town services under proposition 2 1/2?," Working Papers 97-2, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston.
  7. Elio H Londero, 2004. "Poverty Targeting Classifications and Distributional Effects," Public Economics 0407012, EconWPA.
  8. Sen, Amartya K, 1972. "Control Areas and Accounting Prices: An Approach to Economic Evaluation," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 82(325), pages 486-501, Supplemen.
  9. Sandmo, Agnar, 1998. "Redistribution and the marginal cost of public funds," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(3), pages 365-382, December.
  10. Bogart, William T. & Cromwell, Brian A., 2000. "How Much Is a Neighborhood School Worth?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 47(2), pages 280-305, March.
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