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Implications of the Economics of Religion to the Empirical Economic Research

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Author Info

  • Esa Mangeloja

    (University of Jyvaskyla)

Abstract

This paper collects most recent developments in the emerging economic sub-area Economics of Religion. According to secularization thesis, the importance of beliefs and religious activities should weaken as education, scientific knowledge and economic welfare increases. That hypothesis has been previously proofed false, but it continues to affect people's attitudes. This survey analyzes the economic consequences of religion, the two-way interrelationship between religious and economic activities and the present state of economic scrutiny on the subject, exploring the emerging sub-field of economics, which appends our notion of factors behind the economic behavior and growth, by including religious activity as an important factor in economic development. Changes in belief systems, which in many cases will be forms of religion, also can significantly influence individual behavior along with the maximization of individual profit and utility. The finding that economic growth depends also on the productivity of the religious sector, offers interesting future research opportunities.

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File URL: http://128.118.178.162/eps/othr/papers/0310/0310004.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by EconWPA in its series Others with number 0310004.

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Length: 14 pages
Date of creation: 28 Oct 2003
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wpa:wuwpot:0310004

Note: Type of Document - pdf; prepared on Win2000, LaTex; pages: 14
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Web page: http://128.118.178.162

Related research

Keywords: Economics of Religion; Religion; Economic Growth; Growth Theory; human capital; religious capital;

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References

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  1. Guiso, Luigi & Sapienza, Paola & Zingales, Luigi, 2002. "People's Opium? Religion and Economic Attitudes," CEPR Discussion Papers 3588, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Keely, Louise, 2003. "Comment on: People's opium? Religion and economic attitudes," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 283-287, January.
  3. Barro, Robert J, 2000. " Inequality and Growth in a Panel of Countries," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 5-32, March.
  4. Laurence R. Iannaccone, 1998. "Introduction to the Economics of Religion," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 36(3), pages 1465-1495, September.
  5. McCleary, Rachel & Barro, Robert, 2002. "Religion and Political Economy in an International Panel," Scholarly Articles 3221170, Harvard University Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Lou O'Neil, Mary & Bilgin, Mehmet Huseyin & Lau, Chi Keung Marco, 2012. "The Effects of Religious Beliefs on the Working Decisions of Women: Some Evidence from Turkey," MPRA Paper 46973, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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