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Religion, Culture, and Economic Performance

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  • Marcus Noland

    ()
    (Peterson Institute for International Economics)

Abstract

The hypothesis that the coefficients on variables of religious affiliation are jointly equal to zero can frequently be rejected at conventional levels of statistical significance (i.e., religion matters), but no robust relationship between adherence to major world religions and national economic performance is uncovered, using both cross-national and subnational data. The results with respect to Islam do not support the notion that it is inimical to growth. On the contrary, every statistically significant coefficient on Muslim population shares reported in this paper - in both cross-country and within-country statistical analyses - is positive. If anything, Islam promotes growth.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Peterson Institute for International Economics in its series Working Paper Series with number WP03-8.

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Date of creation: Sep 2003
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Handle: RePEc:iie:wpaper:wp03-8

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Keywords: Economic growth; convergence; religion; Islam; India; Malaysia; Ghana;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Benabou, Roland, 2008. "Ideology," IZA Discussion Papers 3416, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Paul Frijters & Juan D. Barón, 2012. "The Cult of Theoi: Economic Uncertainty and Religion," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 88(s1), pages 116-136, 06.
  3. Roland Bénabou & Jean Tirole, 2006. "Belief in a Just World and Redistributive Politics," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 121(2), pages 699-746, May.
  4. Kunting Chen, 2012. "Analysis of the Great Divergence under a Unified Endogenous Growth Model," Annals of Economics and Finance, Society for AEF, vol. 13(2), pages 317-353, November.
  5. Lou O'Neil, Mary & Bilgin, Mehmet Huseyin & Lau, Chi Keung Marco, 2012. "The Effects of Religious Beliefs on the Working Decisions of Women: Some Evidence from Turkey," MPRA Paper 46973, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Marcus Noland & Howard Pack, 2004. "Islam, Globalization, and Economic Performance in the Middle East," Policy Briefs PB04-04, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  7. Patrick A. Imam & Kangni Kpodar, 2010. "Islamic Banking: How Has it Diffused?," IMF Working Papers 10/195, International Monetary Fund.
  8. Hajj, Mandana & Panizza, Ugo, 2009. "Religion and education gender gap: Are Muslims different?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 337-344, June.
  9. Steven N. Durlauf & Andros Kourtelos & Chih Ming Tan, 2006. "Is God in the details? A reexamination of the Role of Relegion in Economic," University of Cyprus Working Papers in Economics 10-2006, University of Cyprus Department of Economics.
  10. Steven N. Durlauf & Andros Kourtellos & Chih Ming Tan, 2006. "Is God in the Details? A Reexamination of the Role of Religion in Economic Growth," Discussion Papers Series, Department of Economics, Tufts University 0613, Department of Economics, Tufts University.
  11. Charles Plaigin, 2009. "Exploratory study on the presence of cultural and institutional growth spillovers," DULBEA Working Papers 09-03.RS, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.

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