Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Multi-Dimensional Urban Sprawl in Europe: a Self-Organizing Map Approach

Contents:

Author Info

  • Daniel Arribas-Bel

    ()

  • Peter Nijkamp

    ()

  • Henk Scholten

Abstract

The present paper considers urban sprawl in Europe from a multi- dimensional and exploratory point of view. Several literatures on the topic (mainly from urban economics, but also from other fields such as urban planning or regional science) are reviewed to extract the main dimensions of the phenomenon, which are found to be the following six: connectivity, decentralization, density, scattering, accessibility to open space and land- use mix. Several indicators are defined and calculated to measure them for a representative sample of 209 European cities. The data are presented to the self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm to observe how the different dimensions interact with each other and what is their behaviour. The analysis of the SOM reveals very interesting patterns that could not be unveiled otherwise. The paper also presents results of an exploration on the relation to geographical location and population size, characterizing the cities in terms of their degree and variety of sprawl.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www-sre.wu.ac.at/ersa/ersaconfs/ersa10/ERSA2010finalpaper485.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by European Regional Science Association in its series ERSA conference papers with number ersa10p485.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Sep 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa10p485

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Welthandelsplatz 1, 1020 Vienna, Austria
Web page: http://www.ersa.org

Related research

Keywords:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Masahisa Fujita & Paul Krugman & Anthony J. Venables, 2001. "The Spatial Economy: Cities, Regions, and International Trade," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262561476, December.
  2. Marcy Burchfield & Henry G. Overman & Diego Puga & Matthew A. Turner, 2005. "Causes of sprawl: A portrait from space," Working Papers, University of Toronto, Department of Economics tecipa-192, University of Toronto, Department of Economics.
  3. Edward L. Glaeser & Matthew E. Kahn, 2003. "Sprawl and Urban Growth," NBER Working Papers 9733, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Brueckner, Jan K. & Largey, Ann G., 2008. "Social interaction and urban sprawl," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 18-34, July.
  5. Turner, Matthew A., 2007. "A simple theory of smart growth and sprawl," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 61(1), pages 21-44, January.
  6. Jan Ritsema van Eck & Eric Koomen, 2008. "Characterising urban concentration and land-use diversity in simulations of future land use," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 123-140, March.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Karima Kourtit & Daniel Arribas-Bel & Peter Nijkamp, 2012. "High performers in complex spatial systems: a self-organizing mapping approach with reference to The Netherlands," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, Springer, vol. 48(2), pages 501-527, April.
  2. Karima Kourtit & Daniel Arribas-Bel & Peter Nijkamp, 2013. "High Performance in Complex Spatial Systems: A Self-Organizing Mapping Approach with Reference to The Netherlands," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 13-194/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
  3. Nijkamp Peter, 2012. "Behaviour of Humans and Behaviour of Models in Dynamic Space," Quaestiones Geographicae, De Gruyter Open, De Gruyter Open, vol. 31(2), pages 7-19, June.
  4. Walid Oueslati & Seraphim Alvanides & Guy Garrod, 2014. "Determinants of urban sprawl in European cities," Working Papers, HAL hal-00943319, HAL.
  5. Karima Kourtit & Peter Nijkamp & Soushi Suzuki, 2013. "The Rat Race Between World Cities: In Search of Exceptional Places by Means of Super-Efficient Data Development Analysis," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers, Tinbergen Institute 13-104/VIII, Tinbergen Institute.
  6. Barry Kew & Brian D. Lee, 2013. "Measuring Sprawl across the Urban Rural Continuum Using an Amalgamated Sprawl Index," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 5(5), pages 1806-1828, April.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wiw:wiwrsa:ersa10p485. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Gunther Maier).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.