Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Mega-Sporting Events in Developing Nations : Playing the Way to Prosperity?

Contents:

Author Info

Abstract

Supporters of mega-sporting events such as the World Cup and Olympics claim that these events attract hoards of wealthy visitors and lead to lasting economic benefits for the host regions. For this reason, cities and countries compete vigorously for the right to stage these spectacles. Recently, developing countries have become increasingly vocal in demanding that they get the right to share in the economic benefits of these international games. China, for example, has been awarded the 2008 Summer Olympics, and an African nation seems destined to host the 2010 World Cup. The specialized infrastructure and operating expenses required to host these events, however, can be extremely costly, and it is not at all clear that either the long or short-term benefits of the games are anywhere nearly large enough to cover these costs. This paper reviews other researchersÂ’ as well as our own previous work on mega-sporting events such as the Super Bowl and World Series as well as international events like the World Cup and Olympics. Independent researchers nearly unanimously find that boostersÂ’ projections of the economic impact of sporting events exaggerate the true economic impact of these competitions by a wide margin. In particular, in this paper we focus on the particular circumstances that face developing countries hosting these games. Our research suggests that in most cases mega-sporting events are an even worse investment for developing countries than for industrialized countries.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/mathesonprosperity.pdf
File Function: Full text
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Williams College in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 2003-17.

as in new window
Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2003
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in South African Journal of Economics, Vol. 72:5 (December 2004), 1084-1095.
Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2003-17

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Williamstown, MA 01267
Phone: 413 597 2476
Fax: 413 597 4045
Email:
Web page: http://econ.williams.edu
More information through EDIRC

Order Information:
Email:

Related research

Keywords: Development Planning and Policy; Sports; Gambling; Recreation; Tourism;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. John J. Siegfried & Andrew Zimbalist, 2000. "The Economics of Sports Facilities and Their Communities," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 14(3), pages 95-114, Summer.
  2. Robert Baade & Victor Matheson, 2000. "Bidding for the Olympics: Fools Gold?," IASE Conference Papers 0007, International Association of Sports Economists.
  3. Robert Baade & Victor Matheson, 2004. "The Quest for the Cup: Assessing the Economic Impact of the World Cup," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(4), pages 343-354.
  4. Robert Baade & Victor Matheson, 1999. "An assessment of the economic impact of the american football championship, the Superbowl, on host communities," IASE Conference Papers 9903, International Association of Sports Economists.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Coupe du Monde de la FIFA 2014 au Brésil : est-ce vraiment rentable ?
    by julien.moussavi@gmail.com (Julien Moussavi) in BS Initiative on 2014-06-05 08:28:44
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Robert Baumann & Victor Matheson, 2013. "Infrastructure Investments and Mega-Sports Events: Comparing the Experience of Developing and Industrialized Countries," Working Papers 1305, College of the Holy Cross, Department of Economics.
  2. Georgios Kavetsos & Stefan Szymanski, 2008. "National Wellbeing and International Sports Events," Working Papers 0804, International Association of Sports Economists & North American Association of Sports Economists.
  3. Wolfgang Maennig & Florian Schwarthoff, 2008. "Stadium Architecture and Regional Economic Development: International Experience and the Plans of Durban," Working Papers 0816, International Association of Sports Economists & North American Association of Sports Economists.
  4. Vinayak Uppal & Debjani Ghosh, 2010. "The Impact of the Commonwealth Games 2010 on Urban Development of Delhi -An Analysis with a Historical Perspective from Worldwide Experiences and the 1982 Asian Games," Working Papers id:2456, eSocialSciences.
  5. Swart, Kamilla & Bob, Urmilla, 2012. "Listening to community voices: Athlone and green point residents' views on the location of the 2010 FIFA World Cup Stadium in Cape Town," Edition HWWI: Chapters, in: Zur Ökonomik von Spitzenleistungen im internationalen Sport, pages 101-122 Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
  6. Robert Gasquez & Vicente Royuela, 2012. "Is football an indicator of development at the international level?," Working Papers in Economics 275, Universitat de Barcelona. Espai de Recerca en Economia.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2003-17. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Stephen Sheppard).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.