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The effect of male migration for work on employment patterns of females in nepal

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Author Info

  • Lokshin, Michael
  • Glinskaya, Elena

Abstract

This paper assesses the impact of work-related migration by males on the labor market behavior of females in Nepal. Using data from the 2004 Nepal household survey, the authors apply the Instrumental Variable Full Information Maximum Likelihood method to account for unobserved factors that could simultaneously affect males'decision to migrate and females'decision to participate in the labor market. The results indicate that male migration for work has a negative impact on the level of market work participation by the women left behind. The authors find evidence of substantial heterogeneity (based both on observable and unobservable characteristics) in the impact of male migration. The findings highlight the important gender dimension of the impact of predominantly male worker migration on the wellbeing of sending households. The authors argue that strategies for economic development in Nepal should take into account such gender aspects of the migration dynamics.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4757.

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Date of creation: 01 Oct 2008
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4757

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Related research

Keywords: Population Policies; Anthropology; Gender and Development; Housing&Human Habitats; Gender and Law;

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References

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  1. Kim, Namsuk, 2007. "The impact of remittances on labor supply : the case of Jamaica," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4120, The World Bank.
  2. Carrasco, Raquel, 2001. "Binary Choice with Binary Endogenous Regressors in Panel Data: Estimating the Effect of Fertility on Female Labor Participation," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 19(4), pages 385-94, October.
  3. Cappellari, Lorenzo, 2002. " Do the 'Working Poor' Stay Poor? An Analysis of Low Pay Transitions in Italy," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 64(2), pages 87-110, May.
  4. James J. Heckman & Edward J. Vytlacil, 2000. "Local Instrumental Variables," NBER Technical Working Papers 0252, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2006. "Migration, Remittances, and Male and Female Employment Patterns," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 96(2), pages 222-226, May.
  6. James J. Heckman & Edward Vytlacil, 2005. "Structural Equations, Treatment Effects and Econometric Policy Evaluation," NBER Technical Working Papers 0306, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Hildebrandt, Nicole & McKenzie, David, 2005. "The effects of migration on child health in Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3573, The World Bank.
  8. Edward Vytlacil & James J. Heckman, 2001. "Policy-Relevant Treatment Effects," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 91(2), pages 107-111, May.
  9. Bjorklund, Anders & Moffitt, Robert, 1987. "The Estimation of Wage Gains and Welfare Gains in Self-selection," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 42-49, February.
  10. Kniesner, Thomas J, 1976. "An Indirect Test of Complementarity in a Family Labor Supply Model," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 44(4), pages 651-69, July.
  11. Kaivan Munshi, 2003. "Networks In The Modern Economy: Mexican Migrants In The U.S. Labor Market," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 118(2), pages 549-599, May.
  12. Acosta, Pablo, 2006. "Labor supply, school attendance, and remittances from international migration : the case of El Salvador," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3903, The World Bank.
  13. James H. Stock & Motohiro Yogo, 2002. "Testing for Weak Instruments in Linear IV Regression," NBER Technical Working Papers 0284, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Arild Aakvik & James J. Heckman & Edward J. Vytlacil, 2000. "Treatment Effects for Discrete Outcomes when Responses to Treatment Vary Among Observationally Identical Persons: An Application to Norwegian ..," NBER Technical Working Papers 0262, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  15. Lokshin, Michael & Bontch-Osmolovski, Mikhail & Glinskaya, Elena, 2007. "Work-related migration and poverty reduction in Nepal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4231, The World Bank.
  16. Michael A. Leeds & Peter von Allmen, 2004. "Spousal Complementarity in Home Production," American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 63(4), pages 795-811, October.
  17. Carrington, William J & Detragiache, Enrica & Vishwanath, Tara, 1996. "Migration with Endogenous Moving Costs," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 86(4), pages 909-30, September.
  18. Andrews,Donald W. K. & Stock,James H. (ed.), 2005. "Identification and Inference for Econometric Models," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521844413.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Mendola, Mariapia & Carletto, Gero, 2009. "International migration and gender differentials in the home labor market : evidence from Albania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4900, The World Bank.
  2. Youssouf Kiendrebeogo, 2011. "Access to Improved Water Sources and Rural Productivity: Analytical Framework and Cross-country Evidence," Documents de travail, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV 165, Groupe d'Economie du Développement de l'Université Montesquieu Bordeaux IV.
  3. Atamanov, Aziz & Van den Berg, Marrit, 2012. "Heterogeneous Effects of International Migration and Remittances on Crop Income: Evidence from the Kyrgyz Republic," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 620-630.

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