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A positive stigma for child labor ?

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Author Info

  • Patrinos, Harry Anthony
  • Shafiq, M. Najeeb

Abstract

The authors introduce a simple empirical model that assumes a positive stigma (or norm) toward child labor that is common in some developing countries. They illustrate the positive stigma model using data from Guatemala. Controlling for several child and household-level characteristics, the analysis uses two instruments for measuring stigma: a child's indigenous background and the household head's childhood work experience.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 4697.

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Date of creation: 01 Aug 2008
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:4697

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Related research

Keywords: Street Children; Youth and Governance; Children and Youth; Labor Policies; Primary Education;

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References

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  1. Bando, Rosangela & Lopez-Calva, Luis F. & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2005. "Child labor, school attendance, and indigenous households : evidence from Mexico," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3487, The World Bank.
  2. Kruger, Diana I., 2007. "Coffee production effects on child labor and schooling in rural Brazil," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 448-463, March.
  3. George Psacharopoulos, 1997. "Child labor versus educational attainment Some evidence from Latin America," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 377-386.
  4. Katz, Elizabeth G., 1995. "Gender and trade within the household: Observations from rural guatemala," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 23(2), pages 327-342, February.
  5. de Janvry, Alain & Finan, Frederico & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & Vakis, Renos, 2006. "Can conditional cash transfer programs serve as safety nets in keeping children at school and from working when exposed to shocks?," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 79(2), pages 349-373, April.
  6. Victoria Gunnarsson & Peter F. Orazem & Mario A. Sánchez, 2006. "Child Labor and School Achievement in Latin America," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 20(1), pages 31-54.
  7. Furio Camillo Rosati & Mariacristina Rossi, 2003. "Children's Working Hours and School Enrollment: Evidence from Pakistan and Nicaragua," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, World Bank Group, vol. 17(2), pages 283-295, December.
  8. Mary Arends-Kuenning & Suzanne Duryea, 2006. "The Effect of Parental Presence, Parents’ Education, and Household Headship on Adolescents’ Schooling and Work in Latin America," Journal of Family and Economic Issues, Springer, Springer, vol. 27(2), pages 263-286, June.
  9. George Psacharopoulos & Harry Anthony Patrinos, 1997. "Family size, schooling and child labor in Peru - An empirical analysis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 387-405.
  10. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 412-27, June.
  11. Emmanuel Skoufias & Susan Parker, 2006. "Job loss and family adjustments in work and schooling during the Mexican peso crisis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, Springer, vol. 19(1), pages 163-181, February.
  12. Duryea, Suzanne & Arends-Kuenning, Mary, 2003. "School Attendance, Child Labor and Local Labor Market Fluctuations in Urban Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1165-1178, July.
  13. Edmonds, Eric V., 2007. "Child Labor," IZA Discussion Papers 2606, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Paul Schultz, T., 2004. "School subsidies for the poor: evaluating the Mexican Progresa poverty program," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 74(1), pages 199-250, June.
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Cited by:
  1. Vimefall, Elin, 2011. "What determines which children work? Empirical evidence from Kenya," Working Papers, Örebro University, School of Business 2011:3, Örebro University, School of Business.

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