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Environmental Regulation and Productivity Growth: A Study of the APEC Economies

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Author Info

  • Yanrui Wu

    (UWA Business School, The University of Western Australia)

  • Bing Wang

    (School of Economics, Jinan University)

Abstract

Environmental regulation has become more and more important in policy making among the world economies. How has it affected productivity growth and hence economic growth? The answer to this question is either controversial or yet to be explored in many cases. The objective of this paper is to present a case study of 17 Asian Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies. A directional distance function approach is employed to estimate output-oriented Malmquist-Luenberger productivity indices. The latter are in turn decomposed into efficiency changes and technological progress. Work in this paper differs from the existing literature by taking into consideration of the impact of environmental regulation on productivity growth. Three scenarios are modeled, ie. no control on CO2 emissions (unregulated), maintaining current emission level and a partial reduction of emissions. In general, it is found that the rates of productivity growth incorporating CO2 as an undesirable output are slightly higher than those estimated following the traditional method. Furthermore, the causes of productivity changes are also investigated in this paper.

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File URL: http://www.business.uwa.edu.au/school/disciplines/economics/?a=98645
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The University of Western Australia, Department of Economics in its series Economics Discussion / Working Papers with number 07-17.

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Length: 23 pages
Date of creation: 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uwa:wpaper:07-17

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Related research

Keywords: Technical efficiency; technological progress; total factor productivity; directional distance functions; Malmquist–Luenberger index; DEA;

References

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  1. Yanrui Wu, 2004. "Openness, productivity and growth in the APEC economies," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 29(3), pages 593-604, 09.
  2. Francesc Hernández Sancho & Andrés Picazo & Ernest Reig Martínez, 1999. "- Shadow Prices And Distance Functions: An Analysis For Firms Of The Spanish Ceramic Pavements Industry," Working Papers. Serie EC 1999-19, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  3. Rolf Färe & Shawna Grosskopf & Carl A Pasurka, Jr., 2001. "Accounting for Air Pollution Emissions in Measures of State Manufacturing Productivity Growth," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 41(3), pages 381-409.
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