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The Economic Consequences of being Left-handed - Some Sinister Results

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Author Info

  • Kevin Denny

    (University College Dublin)

  • Vincent O'Sullivan

    (University College Dublin)

Abstract

This paper provides the first estimates of the effects of handedness on hourly earnings using data on a sample of 33 year olds in the United Kingdom. Augmenting a conventional earnings equation with indicators of left handedness shows there is a well determined positive effect on male earnings with non-manual workers enjoying a slightly larger premium once we allow for non random selection into occupation. This is not consistent with the view that left-handers in general are in some sense handicapped either being innately or through experiencing a world geared towards right-handers. It is consistent with the popular notion of left- handers having particular talents such as enhanced creativity. The results for females however reveal the opposite, left-handed females are paid significantly less.

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File URL: http://www.ucd.ie/economics/research/papers/2004/WP04.22.pdf
File Function: First version, 2004
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by School Of Economics, University College Dublin in its series Working Papers with number 200422.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: 02 Jul 2004
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ucn:wpaper:200422

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Postal: UCD, Belfield, Dublin 4
Phone: +353-1-7067777
Fax: +353-1-283 0068
Web page: http://www.ucd.ie/economics
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Related research

Keywords: earnings; brain; left-handed;

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References

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  1. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  10. Robert Buchele, 1983. "Economic Achievement and the Power of Positive Thinking," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 18(3), pages 441-449.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Goodman, Joshua Samuel, 2012. "The Wages of Sinistrality: Handedness, Brain Structure and Human Capital Accumulation," Scholarly Articles 7779971, Harvard Kennedy School of Government.
  2. Dr Alex Bryson, 2009. "The Returns to Scarce Talent: Footedness and Player Remuneration in European Soccer," NIESR Discussion Papers 2395, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  3. David Johnston & Michael Nicholls & Manisha Shah & Michael Shields, 2009. "Nature’s experiment? Handedness and early childhood development," Demography, Springer, vol. 46(2), pages 281-301, May.
  4. Paul Gregg & Katharina Janke & Carol Propper, 2008. "Handedness and Child Development," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/198, Department of Economics, University of Bristol, UK.
  5. Paul Frijters & David Johnston & Manisha Shah & Michael Shields, 2013. "Intrahousehold Resource Allocation: Do Parents Reduce or Reinforce Child Ability Gaps?," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(6), pages 2187-2208, December.
  6. Dennis Coates & Sungil Hong & Michael Mondello, 2011. "An Examination of the Effects of the Recent Economic Crisis on Major League Baseball (MLB) Attendance Demand," UMBC Economics Department Working Papers 11-136, UMBC Department of Economics.
  7. Dennis Coates & Sara Azmoudeh Fard, 2011. "Returns to handedness in professional hockey," Working Papers 1121, International Association of Sports Economists & North American Association of Sports Economists.
  8. Kevin Denny, 2006. "Cognitive Ability and Hemispheric Indecision - Two Surpluses and a Deficit," Working Papers 200612, School Of Economics, University College Dublin.
  9. Thomas Buser, 2010. "Handedness predicts Social Preferences: Evidence connecting the Lab to the Field," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-119/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  10. Kevin Denny, 2008. "Handedness and depression, evidence from a large population survey," Working Papers 200815, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
  11. Thomas Buser, 2010. "Handedness predicts Social Preferences: Evidence connecting the Lab to the Field," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 10-119/3, Tinbergen Institute.
  12. Johnston, David W. & Shah, Manisha & Shields, Michael A., 2007. "Handedness, Time Use and Early Childhood Development," IZA Discussion Papers 2752, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Frijters, Paul & Johnston, David W. & Shah, Manisha & Shields, Michael A., 2008. "Early Child Development and Maternal Labor Force Participation: Using Handedness as an Instrument," IZA Discussion Papers 3537, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  14. Hessels, Jolanda & Rietveld, Cornelius A. & van der Zwan, Peter, 2014. "Unraveling two myths about entrepreneurs," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 122(3), pages 435-438.
  15. Johnston, David W. & Nicholls, Michael E. R. & Shah, Manisha & Shields, Michael A., 2010. "Handedness, Health and Cognitive Development: Evidence from Children in the NLSY," IZA Discussion Papers 4774, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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