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The Determinants of Overeducation: Different Measures, Different Outcomes?

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Author Info

  • D. VERHAEST

    ()

  • E. OMEY

    ()

Abstract

Purpose of the paper - To assess the sensitivity of the estimated determinants of overeducation to the used overeducation measure. Design/Methodology/Approach - We analyse the determinants of overeducation among Flemish school leavers in their first job by means of probit regression analysis. Overeducation is measured on the basis of job analysis, self-assessments and realised matches. Findings - Our results demonstrate that the application of different overeducation measures sometimes leads to different outcomes. Only a few variables – for instance the student’s academic grade in the final year – are consistently found to be important for the explanation of overeducation. Some outcomes are consistent with the supposition that some indicators actually measure other concepts. Research limitations/Implications - Further research using job analysis measures that are based on alternative and more recent occupational classifications would be useful. Practical Implications - Measuring overeducation in various ways is recommendable to make reliable conclusions. At least, a careful consideration of the extent to which the measure used really captures overeducation is needed. Originality/Value - The application of different measures provides further insight into the overeducation measurement problem.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration in its series Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium with number 09/592.

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Length: 34 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:09/592

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Keywords: mismatch; overqualification; underemployment; measurement error;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Giuseppe Lucio Gaeta, 2013. "Was it worth it? An empirical analysis of over-education among Ph.D. recipients in Italy," Working Papers 1302, c.MET-05 - Centro interuniversitario di Economia Applicata alle Politiche per L'industria, lo Sviluppo locale e l'Internazionalizzazione.
  2. Verhaest Dieter & Velden Rolf van der, 2010. "Cross-country differences in graduate overeducation and its persistence," ROA Research Memorandum 007, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  3. Stijn Baert & Bart Cockx & Dieter Verhaest, 2012. "Overeducation at the Start of the Career - Stepping Stone or Trap?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3825, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Antonio Di Paolo & Anna Matas & Josep Lluís Raymond, 2014. "Job accessibility, employment and job-education mismatch in the metropolitan area of Barcelona," Working Papers XREAP2014-05, Xarxa de Referència en Economia Aplicada (XREAP), revised May 2014.
  5. Dieter Verhaest & Eddy Omey, 2012. "Overeducation, Undereducation and Earnings: Further Evidence on the Importance of Ability and Measurement Error Bias," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 76-90, March.
  6. Mañé Vernet, Ferran & Miravet, Daniel, 2010. "Sobreeducación y Sobrecualificación en los Universitarios Catalanes. Una perspectiva de género," Working Papers 2072/179592, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
  7. Dieter Verhaest & Eddy Omey, 2010. "The determinants of overeducation: different measures, different outcomes?," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(6), pages 608-625, September.
  8. Verhaest, Dieter & Schatteman, Tom, 2010. "Overeducation in the early career: an analysis using sequence techniques," Working Papers 2010/09, Hogeschool-Universiteit Brussel, Faculteit Economie en Management.
  9. Brahim Boudarbat & Claude Montmarquette, 2013. "Origine et sources de la surqualification dans la région métropolitaine de Montréal," CIRANO Project Reports 2013rp-08, CIRANO.
  10. Carroll, David & Tani, Massimiliano, 2013. "Job Search as a Determinant of Graduate Over-Education: Evidence from Australia," IZA Discussion Papers 7202, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Santiago Budría, 2011. "Are Educational Mismatches Responsible for the ‘Inequality Increasing Effect’ of Education?," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 102(3), pages 409-437, July.

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