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Measuring the Costs of Height Restrictions with a General Equilibrium Model

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  • Richard Arnott
  • James G. MacKinnon

Abstract

This paper investigates the costs of residential height restrictions, using a numerically solvable general equilibrium model based on residential location theory. Time and money costs of travel are treated separately. Household demand recreational land and structure and actual construction cost data are used in an activity analysis formulation of the supply side of the housing market. There are two major conclusions. First, households' demand for recreational land is significant; ignoring it results in simulated cities considerably smaller and denser than is observed. Second, residential height restrictions merit serious consideration since their costs appear to be quite modest.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Queen's University, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 242.

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Length: 28
Date of creation: 1976
Date of revision:
Publication status: Published in Regional Science and Urban Economics, 7, 1977
Handle: RePEc:qed:wpaper:242

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Cited by:
  1. Gobillon, Laurent & le Blanc, David, 2008. "Economic effects of upfront subsidies to ownership: The case of the Prêt à Taux Zéro in France," Journal of Housing Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 1-33, March.
  2. Brueckner, Jan K., 1995. "Strategic control of growth in a system of cities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 393-416, July.
  3. Brueckner, Jan K. & Sridhar, Kala Seetharam, 2012. "Measuring welfare gains from relaxation of land-use restrictions: The case of India's building-height limits," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(6), pages 1061-1067.
  4. Tatsuhito Kono & Takayuki Kaneko & Hisa Morisugi, 2010. "Necessity of minimum floor area ratio regulation: a second-best policy," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer, vol. 44(3), pages 523-539, June.
  5. Brueckner, Jan K. & Lai, Fu-Chuan, 1996. "Urban growth controls with resident landowners," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 125-143, April.
  6. Joshi, Kirti Kusum & Kono, Tatsuhito, 2009. "Optimization of floor area ratio regulation in a growing city," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 502-511, July.
  7. Kono, Tatsuhito & Joshi, Kirti Kusum & Kato, Takeaki & Yokoi, Takahisa, 2012. "Optimal regulation on building size and city boundary: An effective second-best remedy for traffic congestion externality," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(4), pages 619-630.
  8. Bertaud, Alain & Brueckner, Jan K., 2004. "Analyzing building height restrictions - predicted impacts, welfare costs, and a case study of Bangalore, India," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3290, The World Bank.
  9. Hans R. A. Koster & Piet Rietveld & Jos N. van Ommerren, 2011. "Is the Sky the Limit? An Analysis of High-Rise Office Buildings," SERC Discussion Papers 0086, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  10. Bertaud, Alain & Brueckner, Jan K., 2005. "Analyzing building-height restrictions: predicted impacts and welfare costs," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 109-125, March.

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