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Facilitating economic development through the reform of economic instruction

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  • Osipian, Ararat

Abstract

Economic development in many ways depends on the level of human capital in the national economy, including that of economists. Market reforms in the former Soviet Bloc urged drastic changes in economic curriculum necessary to prepare the next generation of economic leaders. This paper states that the reform of economic instruction in the Former Soviet Union should focus on both learning and action. The incorporation of mathematical methods into the new economic curriculum will occur based on close cooperation among mathematicians and economists. The new economic instruction will have an interdisciplinary character and a multidisciplinary setting. There are several second order organizational changes that need to be made. Bachelor and Master’s Degrees should replace the five-year degree. Changes in the curriculum should include separation of core courses and electives including those from other majors, detail-oriented content of the courses, a decreased number of classes per semester and increased time for each class. Faculty retraining should be coordinated both within and between the universities. Financial incentives should be created to encourage the instructors to participate in retraining, to change the content and method of the instruction, and to work effectively in the classroom.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 8462.

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Date of creation: 01 Jan 2004
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:8462

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Keywords: economics; economic instruction; education; reform; transition;

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  1. Gerschenkron, Alexander, 1978. "Samuelson in Soviet Russia: A Report," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 16(2), pages 560-73, June.
  2. Robert J. Shiller & Maxim Boycko & Vladimir Korobov, 1992. "Hunting for Homo Sovieticus: Situational versus Attitudinal Factors in Economic Behavior," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 23(1), pages 127-194.
  3. Alexander Kovzik & Michael Watts, 2001. "Reforming Undergraduate Instruction in Russia, Belarus, and Ukraine," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(1), pages 78-92, January.
  4. Michael Alexeev & Clifford Gaddy & Jim Leitzel, 1992. "Economics in the Former Soviet Union," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 137-148, Spring.
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