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Hunting for Homo Sovieticus: Situational versus Attitudinal Factors in Economic Behavior

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Author Info

  • Robert J. Shiller

    (Yale University)

  • Maxim Boycko

    (Russian Academy of Sciences)

  • Vladimir Korobov

    (Kherson Pedagogical Institute)

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution in its journal Brookings Papers on Economic Activity.

Volume (Year): 23 (1992)
Issue (Month): 1 ()
Pages: 127-194

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Handle: RePEc:bin:bpeajo:v:23:y:1992:i:1992-1:p:127-194

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Related research

Keywords: macroeconomics; Soviet Union; attitudinal; situational; economic behavior; Russia;

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Cited by:
  1. Chong, Alberto & Gradstein, Mark, 2006. "Imposed Institutions and Preferences for Redistribution," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 5922, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Stephanie Eble & Petya Koeva, 2002. "What Determines Individual Preferences over Reform? Microeconomic Evidence from Russia," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 49(Special i), pages 87-110.
  3. Giuliano, Paola & Spilimbergo, Antonio, 2009. "Growing Up in a Recession: Beliefs and the Macroeconomy," IZA Discussion Papers 4365, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Osipian, Ararat, 2004. "Facilitating economic development through the reform of economic instruction," MPRA Paper 8462, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Andrei Shleifer, 1996. "Government in Transition," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research 1783, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  6. Blanchflower, David G., 2001. "Unemployment, Well-Being, and Wage Curves in Eastern and Central Europe," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 15(4), pages 364-402, December.
  7. Hayo, Bernd, 2004. "Public support for creating a market economy in Eastern Europe," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 720-744, December.
  8. Alberto Chong & Mark Gradstein, 2006. "Redistributional Preferences and Imposed Institutions," Research Department Publications, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department 4482, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  9. Robert B. Barsky & Miles S. Kimball & F. Thomas Juster & Matthew D. Shapiro, 1995. "Preference Parameters and Behavioral Heterogeneity: An Experimental Approach in the Health and Retirement Survey," NBER Working Papers 5213, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Earle, John S. & Sakova, Zuzana, 1999. "Entrepreneurship from Scratch: Lessons on the Entry Decision into Self-Employment from Transition Economies," IZA Discussion Papers 79, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Osipian, Ararat, 2004. "Reform of Economic Instruction in the Former Soviet Bloc," MPRA Paper 7589, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  12. van Hoorn, André & Maseland, Robbert, 2010. "Cultural differences between East and West Germany after 1991: Communist values versus economic performance?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 791-804, December.
  13. Alberto Alesina & Nichola Fuchs Schuendeln, 2005. "Good bye Lenin (or not?): The Effect of Communism on People's Preferences," NBER Working Papers 11700, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  14. Wyrwich, Michael, 2013. "Can socioeconomic heritage produce a lost generation with regard to entrepreneurship?," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 28(5), pages 667-682.
  15. Andrew Austin & Tatyana Kosyaeva & Nathaniel Wilcox, 2005. "Believe but Verify? Russian Views and the Market," CERGE-EI Working Papers, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague wp278, The Center for Economic Research and Graduate Education - Economic Institute, Prague.
  16. Hemesath, Michael & Pomponio, Xun, 1995. "Student attitudes toward markets: Comparative survey data from China, the United States and Russia," China Economic Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 6(2), pages 225-238.

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