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Slavery and other property rights

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  • Lagerlöf, Nils-Petter

Abstract

The institution of slavery is found mostly at intermediate stages of agricultural development, and less often among hunter-gatherers and advanced agrarian societies. We explain this pattern in a growth model with land and labor as inputs in production, and an endogenously determined property rights institution. The economy endogenously transits from an egalitarian state with equal property rights, to a despotic slave society where the elite own both people and land; thereafter it endogenously transits into a free labor society, where the elite own the land, but people are free.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 372.

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Date of creation: May 2003
Date of revision: 30 Aug 2006
Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:372

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Keywords: Slavery; long-run growth;

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References

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  1. Oded_Galor & Andrew Mountford, 2006. "Trade and the Great Divergence: The Family Connection," Working Papers 2006-01, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  2. Conning, Jonathan H. & Robinson, James A., 2007. "Property rights and the political organization of agriculture," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 82(2), pages 416-447, March.
  3. Kremer, Michael, 1993. "Population Growth and Technological Change: One Million B.C. to 1990," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, MIT Press, vol. 108(3), pages 681-716, August.
  4. Mitchener, Kris James & McLean, Ian W, 2003. " The Productivity of US States since 1880," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, Springer, vol. 8(1), pages 73-114, March.
  5. Douglas Gollin & Stephen Parente & Richard Rogerson, 2002. "The Role of Agriculture in Development," Center for Development Economics, Department of Economics, Williams College 2002-09, Department of Economics, Williams College.
  6. Galor, Oded & Moav, Omer, 2000. "Natural Selection and the Origin of Economic Growth," Arbetsrapport, Institute for Futures Studies 2000:5, Institute for Futures Studies.
  7. David N. Weil & Oded Galor, 2000. "Population, Technology, and Growth: From Malthusian Stagnation to the Demographic Transition and Beyond," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 90(4), pages 806-828, September.
  8. repec:cup:jechis:v:44:y:1984:i:03:p:635-668_03 is not listed on IDEAS
  9. Matthew J. Baker, 2003. "An Equilibrium Conflict Model of Land Tenure in Hunter-Gatherer Societies," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(1), pages 124-173, February.
  10. Genicot, Garance, 2002. "Bonded labor and serfdom: a paradox of voluntary choice," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 101-127, February.
  11. Coelho, Philip R. P. & McGuire, Robert A., 1997. "African and European Bound Labor in the British New World: The Biological Consequences of Economic Choices," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, vol. 57(01), pages 83-115, March.
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Cited by:
  1. Fernández, Raquel, 2009. "Women's Rights and Development," CEPR Discussion Papers, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers 7464, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  2. Raquel Fernández, 2009. "Women's Rights and Development," NBER Working Papers 15355, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Raquel Fernandez, 2010. "Women's Rights and Development," Working Papers, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group 2011-029, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
  4. Palivos, Theodore & Wang, Ping & Yip, Chong, 2011. "The Colonization of Hong Kong: Establishing the Pearl of Britain-China Trade," MPRA Paper 32271, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2009. "Poaching, Courts, and Settlements:Complementarity of Governance in Labor Markets," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f145, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised 21 Jan 2014.

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