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Dynamics and Stagnation in the Malthusian Epoch

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Abstract

This paper examines the central hypothesis of the influential Malthusian theory, according to which improvements in the technological environment during the pre-industrial era had generated only temporary gains in income per capita, eventually leading to a larger, but not significantly richer, population. Exploiting exogenous sources of cross-country variations in land productivity and the level of technological advancement, the analysis demonstrates that, in accordance with the theory, technological superiority and higher land productivity had significant positive effects on population density but insignificant effects on the standard of living, during the time period 1-1500 CE.

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File URL: http://web.williams.edu/Economics/wp/AshrafGalor-Malthus.pdf
File Function: Full text revised version, July 2010
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, Williams College in its series Department of Economics Working Papers with number 2010-01.

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Length: 54 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2010
Date of revision: Jul 2010
Publication status: Published in American Economic Review, August 2011, 101(5), pp. 2003-2041.
Handle: RePEc:wil:wileco:2010-01

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Keywords: Technological Progress; Population Density; Malthusian Stagnation; Land Productivity; Neolithic Revolution;

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Blog mentions

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  1. Using the Malthusian model to measure technology
    by Jason Collins in Evolving Economics on 2013-03-27 13:08:41

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  1. > Economic History > Very Long-run Growth Economics
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  1. Perangkap Malthus in Wikipedia Malay ne '')
  2. 马尔萨斯陷阱 in Wikipedia Chinese ne '')
  3. Perangkap Malthus in Wikipedia Indonesian ne '')
  4. Μαλθουσιανή παγίδα in Wikipedia Greek ne '')

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