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The impact of class absenteeism on undergraduates’ academic performance: evidence from an elite Economics school in Portugal

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  • Aurora A.C. Teixeira

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    (CEF.UP, Faculdade de Economia, Universidade do Porto; INESC Porto; OBEGEF; UTEN)

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    Abstract

    The empirical literature focusing mainly on the USA suggests that class absenteeism undermines students’ academic performance and that an enforced mandatory attendance policy may be beneficial. Based on a different cultural and economic context, and using data on 146 second-year management students enrolled in a Macroeconomics course at an elite economics school in Portugal, it is shown that even when controlling for potential endogenous factors associated to attendance and academic performance, absenteeism considerably lowers the students’ final grade (about 2 points in a 0-20 point grading scheme). In addition, it is established that a compulsory, though flexible, attendance policy contributes to improving students’ academic performance.

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    File URL: http://www.fep.up.pt/investigacao/workingpapers/wp503.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Universidade do Porto, Faculdade de Economia do Porto in its series FEP Working Papers with number 503.

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    Length: 17 pages
    Date of creation: Sep 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:por:fepwps:503

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    Related research

    Keywords: Absenteeism; Academic performance; Economics; Management; University; Portugal;

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    1. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
    2. Astrid Schmulian & Stephen Coetzee, 2011. "Class absenteeism: reasons for non-attendance and the effect on academic performance," Accounting Research Journal, Emerald Group Publishing, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 24(2), pages 178-194, September.
    3. Xavier Triadó-Ivern & Pilar Aparicio-Chueca & Joan Guàrdia-Olmos & Maribel Peró-Cebollero & Natalia Jaría-Chacón, 2013. "Empirical approach to the analysis of university student absenteeism: proposal of a questionnaire for students to evaluate the possible causes," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, Springer, vol. 47(4), pages 2281-2288, June.
    4. Daniel R. Marburger, 2006. "Does Mandatory Attendance Improve Student Performance?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(2), pages 148-155, April.
    5. Nuno Alves & Mário Centeno & Álvaro A. Novo, 2010. "Investment in Education in Portugal: Returns and Heterogeneity," Economic Bulletin and Financial Stability Report Articles, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
    6. Sharmistha Self, 2012. "Studying Absenteeism in Principles of Macroeconomics: Do Attendance Policies Make a Difference?," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 43(3), pages 223-234, July.
    7. Schmidt, Robert M, 1983. "Who Maximizes What? A Study in Student Time Allocation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 73(2), pages 23-28, May.
    8. Stephen Devadoss & John Foltz, 1996. "Evaluation of Factors Influencing Student Class Attendance and Performance," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 499-507.
    9. Daniel R. Marburger, 2001. "Absenteeism and Undergraduate Exam Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 99-109, January.
    10. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2008. "Class Attendance and Exam Performance: A Randomized Experiment," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 213-227, July.
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