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Does a student's preference for a teacher's instructional style matter? An analysis of an economic approach

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  • Tin-chun Lin

    ()
    (Indiana University - Northwest)

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    Abstract

    The hypothesis that a student's preference for a teacher's instructional style indirectly affects a student's grade performance positively and significantly is posed and accepted. In this analysis, one additional higher scale used to indicate student preferences for a teacher's instructional style is estimated to indirectly enhance students' grade performance by 2.302 points; a 1% increase in a student's rating of preference for a teacher's instructional style is estimated to lead to a 1.2039% improvement in a student's grade performance.

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    File URL: http://www.accessecon.com/Pubs/EB/2010/Volume30/EB-10-V30-I2-P123.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by AccessEcon in its journal Economics Bulletin.

    Volume (Year): 30 (2010)
    Issue (Month): 2 ()
    Pages: 1320-1332

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    Handle: RePEc:ebl:ecbull:eb-10-00189

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    Related research

    Keywords: Attendance; Instructional style; Grade performance; Economic behavior;

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    1. David Romer, 1993. "Do Students Go to Class? Should They?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 7(3), pages 167-174, Summer.
    2. Durden, Garey C & Ellis, Larry V, 1995. "The Effects of Attendance on Student Learning in Principles of Economics," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 85(2), pages 343-46, May.
    3. Tsui-Fang Lin & Jennjou Chen, 2006. "Cumulative class attendance and exam performance," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(14), pages 937-942.
    4. Peter Dolton & Oscar Marcenaro & Lucia Navarro, 2001. "The effective use of student time: A stochastic frontier production function case study," CEE Discussion Papers 0010, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
    5. Daniel R. Marburger, 2001. "Absenteeism and Undergraduate Exam Performance," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(2), pages 99-109, January.
    6. Stephen Devadoss & John Foltz, 1996. "Evaluation of Factors Influencing Student Class Attendance and Performance," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 78(3), pages 499-507.
    7. Jennjou Chen & Tsui-Fang Lin, 2008. "Class Attendance and Exam Performance: A Randomized Experiment," The Journal of Economic Education, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(3), pages 213-227, July.
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