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ICT spillovers, absorptive capacity and productivity performance

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  • Ana Rincon
  • Michela VECCHI
  • Francesco VENTURINI

Abstract

We analyse the impact of ICT spillovers on productivity in the uptake of the new technology using company data for the U.S. We account for inter- and intra-industry spillovers and assess the role played by firm’s absorptive capacity. Our results show that intra-industry ICT spillovers have a contemporaneous negative effect that turns positive 5 years after the initial investment. By contrast, inter-industry spillovers are important both in the short and in the long run. In the short run, companies’ innovative effort is complementary to ICT spillovers, but such complementarity disappears with the more pervasive adoption and diffusion of the technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Università di Perugia, Dipartimento Economia, Finanza e Statistica in its series Quaderni del Dipartimento di Economia, Finanza e Statistica with number 103/2012.

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Length: 41 pages
Date of creation: 01 Aug 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:pia:wpaper:103/2012

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Cited by:
  1. Federico Biagi, 2013. "ICT and Productivity: A Review of the Literature," JRC-IPTS Working Papers on Digital Economy 2013-09, Institute of Prospective Technological Studies, Joint Research Centre.

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