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Are Survey measures of Trust Correlated with Experimental Trust? Empirical Evidence from Cameroon

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Author Info

  • Alvin Etang Ndip

    ()
    (Yale University, Economic Growth Centre)

  • David Fielding

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Otago)

  • Stephen Knowles

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Otago)

Abstract

We analyze the correlation between survey-based measures of trust and behavior in the Trust Game in two villages in Cameroon. Some participants play the Trust Game with people from their own village, and others with people from a neighboring village. The survey that the participants complete includes questions about trust and social distance that reflect the experimental treatment. Some measures of survey-based trust are correlated with experimental trust, but the level of correlation is not uniform.

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File URL: http://www.business.otago.ac.nz/econ/research/discussionpapers/DP_1016.pdf
File Function: First version, 2010
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Otago, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1016.

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Length: 12 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2010
Date of revision: Nov 2010
Handle: RePEc:otg:wpaper:1016

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Related research

Keywords: Trust Game; social capital; surveys;

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  1. Nava Ashraf & Iris Bohnet & Nikita Piankov, 2006. "Decomposing trust and trustworthiness," Experimental Economics, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 193-208, September.
  2. Danielson, Anders & Holm, Hakan J, 2003. "Tropic Trust versus Nordic Trust: Experimental Evidence from Tanzania and Sweden," Working Papers 2003:6, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  3. Laura Schechter, 2005. "Traditional trust measurement and the risk confound: An experiment in rural paraguay," Artefactual Field Experiments 00106, The Field Experiments Website.
  4. Danielson, Anders & Holm, Hakan, 2004. "Do You Trust Your Brethren? Eliciting Trust Attitudes and Trust Behavior in a Tanzanian Congregation," Working Papers 2004:2, Lund University, Department of Economics.
  5. Dean Karlan, 2004. "Using experimental economics to measure social capital and predict financial decisions," Artefactual Field Experiments 00074, The Field Experiments Website.
  6. Abigail Barr, 2003. "Trust and expected trustworthiness: experimental evidence from zimbabwean villages," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 113(489), pages 614-630, 07.
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