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Women Helping Women? Role-Model and Mentoring Effects on Female Ph.D. Student in Economics

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  • David Neumark
  • Rosella Gardecki

Abstract

One potential method to increase the success of female graduate students in economics may be to encourage mentoring relationships between these students and female faculty members. Increased hiring of female faculty is viewed as one way to promote such mentoring relationships, perhaps because of role-model effects. A more direct method of promoting such relationships may be for female graduate students to have female faculty serve as dissertation chairs. The evidence in this paper addresses the question of whether either of these strategies results in more successful outcomes for female graduate students. The evidence is based on survey information on female graduate students and faculties of Ph.D.-producing economics departments, covering the mid-1970s to the early 1990s. With respect to characteristics of the institutions at which students are first placed when leaving graduate school, the empirical evidence provides no support for the hypothesis that outcomes for female graduate students are improved by adding female faculty members, or by having a female dissertation chair. However, with respect to time to complete graduate school, and the completion rate, there is some limited evidence of beneficial effects of female faculty members.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 5733.

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Date of creation: Aug 1996
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:5733

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References

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  1. Shulamit B. Kahn, 1995. "Women in the Economics Profession," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(4), pages 193-206, Fall.
  2. repec:fth:prinin:348 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Sara J. Solnick, 1995. "Changes in women's majors from entrance to graduation at women's and coeducational colleges," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 505-514, April.
  4. Karen Dynan & Cecilia Rouse, 1995. "The Underrepresentation of Women in Economics: A Study of Undergraduate Economics Students," Working Papers 727, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
  5. Donna S. Rothstein, 1995. "Do female faculty influence female students' educational and labor market attainments?," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 515-530, April.
  6. Broder, Ivy E, 1993. "Professional Achievements and Gender Differences among Academic Economists," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(1), pages 116-27, January.
  7. Larry D. Singell & Joe A. Stone, 1993. "Gender Differences In Ph.D. Economists' Careers," Contemporary Economic Policy, Western Economic Association International, vol. 11(4), pages 95-106, October.
  8. Pamela S. Tolbert & Alice Andrews & Tal Simons & Jaehoon Rhee, 1995. "The effects of gender composition in academic departments on faculty turnover," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 562-579, April.
  9. Hansen, W Lee, 1991. "The Education and Training of Economics Doctorates: Major Findings of the Executive Secretary of the American Economic Association's Commission on Graduate Education in Economics," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 29(3), pages 1054-87, September.
  10. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Donna S. Rothstein, 1993. "Do Historically Black Institutions of Higher Education Confer Unique Advantages on Black Students: An Initial Analysis," NBER Working Papers 4356, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Karen E. Dynan & Cecilia Elena Rouse, 1995. "The Underrepresentation of Women in Economics: A Study of Undergraduate Economics Students," NBER Working Papers 5299, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Jill M. Constantine, 1995. "The effect of attending historically black colleges and universities on future wages of black students," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(3), pages 531-546, April.
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Cited by:
  1. Joyce P. Jacobsen, 2003. "Do Women and Non-economists Add Diversity to Research in Industrial Relations and Labor Economics?," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 29(4), pages 575-591, Fall.
  2. Eric P. Bettinger & Bridget Terry Long, 2005. "Do Faculty Serve as Role Models? The Impact of Instructor Gender on Female Students," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 152-157, May.
  3. Ana Rute Cardoso & Rudolf Winter-Ebmer, 2007. "Mentoring and Segregation: Female-Led Firms and Gender Wage Policies," Economics working papers 2007-20, Department of Economics, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  4. Hoffman, Florian & Oreopoulos, Philip, 2009. "A Professor Like Me: Influence of Professor Gender on University Achievement," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2009-13, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 02 Feb 2009.
  5. Holmlund, Helena & Sund, Krister, 2008. "Is the gender gap in school performance affected by the sex of the teacher," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 15(1), pages 37-53, February.
  6. Butler, Daniel M. & Butler, Richard J., 2011. "The Internet's effect on women's coauthoring rates and academic job market decisions: The case of political science," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 665-672, August.
  7. Bednar, Steven & Gicheva, Dora, 2014. "Are Female Supervisors More Female-Friendly?," Working Papers 14-1, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Department of Economics.
  8. Hilmer, Michael J. & Hilmer, Christiana E., 2006. "Women Helping Women in Agricultural Economics? Same-Gender Mentoring and Early Career Research Productivity for Agricultural Economics Ph.D.s," 2006 Annual meeting, July 23-26, Long Beach, CA 21067, American Agricultural Economics Association (New Name 2008: Agricultural and Applied Economics Association).
  9. David Colander & Jessica Holmes, 2007. "Gender And Graduate Economics Education In The Us," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0725, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.

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