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Who Is in Control? The Determinants of Patient Adherence with Medication Therapy

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  • Sergei Koulayev
  • Niels Skipper
  • Emilia Simeonova

Abstract

Non-compliance with medication therapy remains an unsolved and expensive problem for health care systems around the world. Yet we know little about the factors that determine a patient’s decision to follow treatment recommendations. This study uses a unique panel dataset comprising all prescription drug users, physicians, and all prescription drug sales in Denmark over seven years to analyze the contributions of doctor-, patient-, and drug-specific factors to the adherence decision. Our findings have important implications for the design of incentive schemes targeted at improving chronic disease management.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 19496.

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Date of creation: Oct 2013
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:19496

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  1. Amitabh Chandra & Jonathan Gruber & Robin McKnight, 2010. "Patient Cost-Sharing and Hospitalization Offsets in the Elderly," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 100(1), pages 193-213, March.
  2. Niels Skipper, 2013. "On The Demand For Prescription Drugs: Heterogeneity In Price Responses," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 22(7), pages 857-869, 07.
  3. Igal Hendel & Aviv Nevo, 2005. "Measuring the Implications of Sales and Consumer Inventory Behavior," NBER Working Papers 11307, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Manning, Willard G, et al, 1987. "Health Insurance and the Demand for Medical Care: Evidence from a Randomized Experiment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(3), pages 251-77, June.
  5. Paul Contoyannis & Jeremiah Hurley & Paul Grootendorst & Sung-Hee Jeon & Robyn Tamblyn, 2005. "Estimating the price elasticity of expenditure for prescription drugs in the presence of non-linear price schedules: an illustration from Quebec, Canada," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(9), pages 909-923.
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