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Financial Frictions and the Persistence of History: A Quantitative Exploration

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  • Francisco J. Buera
  • Yongseok Shin

Abstract

We quantify the role of financial frictions and the initial misallocation of resources in explaining development dynamics. Following a reform that triggers efficient reallocation of resources, our model economy with financial frictions converges slowly to the new steady state—it takes twice as long to cover half the distance to the steady state as the neoclassical growth model. Investment rates and total factor productivity start out low and rise over time. These model dynamics are endogenously determined by the extent of initial resource misallocation and the degree of financial frictions. We present data from post-war miracle economies on the evolution of macro aggregates, factor reallocation, and establishment size distribution, which support the aggregate and micro-level implications of our theory.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 16400.

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Date of creation: Sep 2010
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:16400

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  1. Kaiji Chen & Ayse Imrohoroglu & Selo Imrohoroglu, 2005. "Japanese Saving Rate," Macroeconomics 0502017, EconWPA.
  2. Sharun W. Mukand & Dani Rodrik, 2005. "In Search of the Holy Grail: Policy Convergence, Experimentation, and Economic Performance," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 374-383, March.
  3. Gérard Roland, 2000. "Transition and Economics: Politics, Markets, and Firms," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262182033, January.
  4. Jeong, Hyeok & Townsend, Robert M., 2008. "Growth And Inequality: Model Evaluation Based On An Estimation-Calibration Strategy," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(S2), pages 231-284, September.
  5. Robert M. Townsend & Kenichi Ueda, 2003. "Financial Deepening, Inequality, and Growth: A Model-Based Quantitative Evaluation," IMF Working Papers 03/193, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Chang-Tai Hsieh & Peter J. Klenow, 2009. "Misallocation and Manufacturing TFP in China and India," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 124(4), pages 1403-1448, November.
  7. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 2013. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Working Papers 2013-12, Brown University, Department of Economics.
  8. Marco Cagetti & Mariacristina De Nardi, 2003. "Entrepreneurship, frictions and wealth," Working Papers 620, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  9. Per Krusell & Anthony A. Smith, Jr., . "Income and Wealth Heterogeneity in the Macroeconomy," GSIA Working Papers 1997-37, Carnegie Mellon University, Tepper School of Business.
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