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Short-run Effects of Parental Job Loss on Children's Academic Achievement

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  • Ann Huff Stevens
  • Jessamyn Schaller

Abstract

We study the relationship between parental job loss and children’s academic achievement using data on job loss and grade retention from the 1996, 2001, and 2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. We find that a parental job loss increases the probability of children’s grade retention by 0.8 percentage points, or around 15 percent. After conditioning on child fixed effects, there is no evidence of significantly increased grade retention prior to the job loss, suggesting a causal link between the parental employment shock and children’s academic difficulties. These effects are concentrated among children whose parents have a high school education or less.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 15480.

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Date of creation: Nov 2009
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Publication status: published as Stevens, Ann Huff & Schaller, Jessamyn, 2011. "Short-run effects of parental job loss on children's academic achievement," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(2), pages 289-299, April.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:15480

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Cited by:
  1. Michael W. L. Elsby & Bart Hobijn & Aysegul Sahin, 2010. "The Labor Market in the Great Recession," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 41(1 (Spring), pages 1-69.
  2. Jesse Rothstein, 2012. "The Labor Market Four Years Into the Crisis: Assessing Structural Explanations," NBER Working Papers 17966, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Steven J. Davis & Till M. von Wachter, 2011. "Recessions and the Cost of Job Loss," NBER Working Papers 17638, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Zwysen, Wouter, 2013. "Where you go depends on where you come from: the influence of father’s employment status on young adult’s labour market experiences," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-24, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  5. Jessamyn Schaller & Ann Huff Stevens, 2014. "Short-run Effects of Job Loss on Health Conditions, Health Insurance, and Health Care Utilization," NBER Working Papers 19884, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Lindo, Jason M., 2011. "Parental job loss and infant health," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 869-879.
  7. Coelli, Michael B., 2011. "Parental job loss and the education enrollment of youth," Labour Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 25-35, January.

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