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Parental Job Loss and Children’s School Performance

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  • Mari Rege
  • Kjetil Telle
  • Mark Votruba

    ()
    (Statistics Norway)

Abstract

Using Norwegian register data we estimate how children’s school performance is affected by their parents’ exposure to plant closure. Fathers’ exposure leads to a substantial decline in children’s graduation-year grade point average, but only in municipalities with mediocre-performing job markets. The negative effect does not appear to be driven by a reduction in father’s income and employment, an increase in parental divorce, or the trauma of relocating. In contrast, mothers’ exposure leads to improved school performance. Our findings appear to be consistent with sociological “role theories,” with parents unable to fully shield their children from the stress caused by threats to the father’s traditional role as breadwinner, and mothers responding to job loss by allocating greater attention towards child rearing.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Research Department of Statistics Norway in its series Discussion Papers with number 517.

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Date of creation: Oct 2007
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Handle: RePEc:ssb:dispap:517

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Keywords: educational outcomes; downsizing; job loss; layoffs; plant closure;

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Cited by:
  1. Venke Furre Haaland & Mari Rege & Mark Votruba, 2013. "Nobody Home: The Effect of Maternal Labor Force Participation on Long-Term Child Outcomes," CESifo Working Paper Series 4495, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Powdthavee, Nattavudh & Vernoit, James, 2013. "Parental unemployment and children's happiness: A longitudinal study of young people's well-being in unemployed households," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 253-263.
  3. Mörk, Eva & Sjögren, Anna & Svaleryd, Helena, 2014. "Parental unemployment and child health," Working Paper Series 2014:2, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  4. Venke Furre Haaland & Kjetil Telle, 2013. "Pro-cyclical mortality. Evidence from Norway," Discussion Papers 766, Research Department of Statistics Norway.
  5. Marcus Eliason, 2012. "Lost jobs, broken marriages," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 25(4), pages 1365-1397, October.
  6. Carrington, William J. & Fallick, Bruce C., 2014. "Why Do Earnings Fall with Job Displacement?," Working Paper 1405, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
  7. Frauke H. Peter, 2013. "Trick or Treat?: Maternal Involuntary Job Loss and Children's Non-cognitive Skills," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1297, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.

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