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The Transmission of Women's Fertility, Human Capital and Work Orientation Across Immigrant Generations

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  • Francine D. Blau
  • Lawrence M. Kahn
  • Albert Yung-Hsu Liu
  • Kerry L. Papps

Abstract

Using 1995–2011 Current Population Survey and 1970–2000 Census data, we find that the fertility, education and labor supply of second generation women (US-born women with at least one foreign-born parent) are significantly positively affected by the immigrant generation’s levels of these variables, with the effect of the fertility and labor supply of women from the mother’s source country generally larger than that of women from the father’s source country and the effect of the education of men from the father’s source country larger than that of women from the mother’s source country. We present some evidence that suggests our findings for fertility and labor supply are due to at least in part to intergenerational transmission of gender roles. Transmission rates for immigrant fertility and labor supply between generations are higher than for education, but there is considerable intergenerational assimilation toward native levels for all three of these outcomes.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 14388.

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Date of creation: Oct 2008
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Publication status: published as Francine Blau & Lawrence Kahn & Albert Liu & Kerry Papps, 2013. "The transmission of women’s fertility, human capital, and work orientation across immigrant generations," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 26(2), pages 405-435, April.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14388

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  1. David Card & John DiNardo & Eugena Estes, 2000. "The More Things Change: Immigrants and the Children of Immigrants in the 1940s, the 1970s, and the 1990s," NBER Chapters, in: Issues in the Economics of Immigration, pages 227-270 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Blau, Francine D. & Kahn, Lawrence M. & Papps, Kerry L., 2008. "Gender, Source Country Characteristics and Labor Market Assimilation among Immigrants: 1980-2000," IZA Discussion Papers 3725, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Blau, Francine D. & Kahn, Lawrence M., 2011. "Substitution Between Individual and Cultural Capital: Pre-Migration Labor Supply, Culture and US Labor Market Outcomes Among Immigrant Woman," IZA Discussion Papers 5890, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Alesina, Alberto & Giuliano, Paola & Nunn, Nathan, 2011. "On the Origins of Gender Roles: Women and the Plough," IZA Discussion Papers 5735, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  10. Raquel Fernandez & Alessandra Fogli, 2005. "Culture: an empirical investigation of beliefs, work, and fertility," Staff Report 361, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
  11. Philipp Bauer & Regina Riphahn, 2007. "Heterogeneity in the intergenerational transmission of educational attainment: evidence from Switzerland on natives and second-generation immigrants," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 20(1), pages 121-148, February.
  12. Chiswick, Barry R, 1988. "Differences in Education and Earnings across Racial and Ethnic Groups: Tastes, Discrimination, and Investments in Child Quality," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 103(3), pages 571-97, August.
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  14. Antecol, Heather, 2000. "An examination of cross-country differences in the gender gap in labor force participation rates," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(4), pages 409-426, July.
  15. Jaeger, David A, 1997. "Reconciling the Old and New Census Bureau Education Questions: Recommendations for Researchers," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 15(3), pages 300-309, July.
  16. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 2007. "Gender and Assimilation Among Mexican Americans," NBER Chapters, in: Mexican Immigration to the United States, pages 57-106 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Marina Della Giusta & Nigar Hashimzade, 2009. "Family Values and Educational Choice," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2009-01, Henley Business School, Reading University.
  2. Leah Platt Boustan & William J. Collins, 2013. "The Origin and Persistence of Black-White Differences in Women's Labor Force Participation," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital in History: The American Record National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Kelly Ragan, 2012. "Sex and the Single Girl: The Role of Culture in Contraception Demand," 2012 Meeting Papers 846, Society for Economic Dynamics.
  4. Z. Eylem Gevrek & Deniz Gevrek & Sonam Gupta, 2012. "Culture, Intermarriage, and Immigrant Women's - Labor Supply," Working Paper Series of the Department of Economics, University of Konstanz 2012-28, Department of Economics, University of Konstanz.
  5. Gevrek, Z. Eylem & Gevrek, Deniz & Gupta, Sonam, 2011. "Culture, Intermarriage, and Differentials in Second-Generation Immigrant Women's Labor Supply," IZA Discussion Papers 6043, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Bastien CHABE-FERRET, 2013. "The Importance of Fertility Norms: New Evidence from France," Discussion Papers (IRES - Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales) 2013012, Université catholique de Louvain, Institut de Recherches Economiques et Sociales (IRES).
  7. Sweetman, Arthur & van Ours, Jan C., 2014. "Immigration: What about the Children and Grandchildren?," IZA Discussion Papers 7919, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Stichnoth, Holger & Yeter, Mustafa, 2013. "Cultural influences on the fertility behaviour of first- and second-generation immigrants in Germany," ZEW Discussion Papers 13-023, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
  9. Douglas Almond & Lena Edlund & Kevin Milligan, 2009. "O Sister, Where Art Thou? The Role of Son Preference and Sex Choice: Evidence from Immigrants to Canada," NBER Working Papers 15391, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Nicolas Hérault & Guyonne Kalb, 2009. "Intergenerational Correlation of Labour Market Outcomes," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2009n14, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
  11. Francine D. Blau, 2013. "Comment on "The Female Labor Force and Long-run Development: The American Experience in Comparative Perspective"," NBER Chapters, in: Human Capital in History: The American Record National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  12. Adsera, Alicia & Ferrer, Ana, 2014. "Immigrants and Demography: Marriage, Divorce, and Fertility," IZA Discussion Papers 7982, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  13. Rainald Borck, 2011. "Adieu Rabenmutter - The Effect of Culture on Fertility, Female Labour Supply, the Gender Wage Gap and Childcare," CESifo Working Paper Series 3337, CESifo Group Munich.
  14. Marcén, Miriam & Bellido, Héctor, 2013. "Teen Mothers and Culture," MPRA Paper 44712, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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