Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

The impact of childcare enrollment on women’s selection into self-employment

Contents:

Author Info

  • Florian Noseleit

    (Faculty of Economics and Business, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen)

Abstract

Women carry on to provide substantially more work in the household compared to men despite increasing female labor force participation. This inequality in household production can be considered an informal institution that may affect occupational choices of women. This paper argues that such informal institutional arrangements cause adverse selection into selfemployment among women since the promise of flexibly combining household production and labor force participation offered by self-employment is more appealing to women than men. However, formal institutions like childcare arrangements outside the household may reduce such adverse selection. We hypothesize that childcare availability influences the selection of females into self-employment conditional on the frequency of young children in households. Our empirical evidence suggests that better childcare availability causes fewer women to enter self-employment but those that enter tend to have higher levels of formal education and hire more often employees.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://web2.msm.nl/RePEc/msm/wpaper/MSM-WP2014-15.pdf
File Function: First version, 2014
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Maastricht School of Management in its series Working Papers with number 2014/15.

as in new window
Length: 24 pages
Date of creation: May 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:msm:wpaper:2014/15

Contact details of provider:
Postal: P.O. Box 1203, 6201 BE Maastricht
Phone: +31 43 387 08 08
Fax: +31 43 387 08 00
Email:
Web page: http://research.msm.nl
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. André van Stel & Roy Thurik & Ingrid Verheul, 2006. "Explaining female and male entrepreneurship at the country level," Scales Research Reports N200510, EIM Business and Policy Research.
  2. Johan Wiklund & Dean Shepherd, 2003. "Aspiring for, and Achieving Growth: The Moderating Role of Resources and Opportunities," Journal of Management Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(8), pages 1919-1941, December.
  3. Wellington, Alison J., 2006. "Self-employment: the new solution for balancing family and career?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 357-386, June.
  4. Davidsson, Per, 1991. "Continued entrepreneurship: Ability, need, and opportunity as determinants of small firm growth," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 6(6), pages 405-429, November.
  5. DeMartino, Richard & Barbato, Robert, 2003. "Differences between women and men MBA entrepreneurs: exploring family flexibility and wealth creation as career motivators," Journal of Business Venturing, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 815-832, November.
  6. Cowling, Marc & Taylor, Mark, 2001. " Entrepreneurial Women and Men: Two Different Species?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 16(3), pages 167-75, May.
  7. Claudia Goldin, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution that Transformed Women's Employment, Education, and Family," NBER Working Papers 11953, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Amanda Elam & Siri Terjesen, 2010. "Gendered Institutions and Cross-National Patterns of Business Creation for Men and Women," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 22(3), pages 331-348, July.
  9. Scott Shane, 2009. "Why encouraging more people to become entrepreneurs is bad public policy," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 33(2), pages 141-149, August.
  10. Mishra, Vinod & Smyth, Russell, 2010. "Female labor force participation and total fertility rates in the OECD: New evidence from panel cointegration and Granger causality testing," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 62(1), pages 48-64, January.
  11. Akerlof, George A, 1970. "The Market for 'Lemons': Quality Uncertainty and the Market Mechanism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 84(3), pages 488-500, August.
  12. Rachel Connelly, 1992. "Self-employment and providing child care," Demography, Springer, vol. 29(1), pages 17-29, February.
  13. Goldin, Claudia, 2006. "The Quiet Revolution That Transformed Women’s Employment, Education, and Family," Scholarly Articles 2943933, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  14. Saul Estrin & Tomasz Mickiewicz, 2011. "Institutions and female entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 37(4), pages 397-415, November.
  15. Michael Fritsch & Florian Noseleit, 2013. "Start-ups, long- and short-term survivors, and their contribution to employment growth," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 23(4), pages 719-733, September.
  16. Jovanovic, Boyan, 1982. "Selection and the Evolution of Industry," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 50(3), pages 649-70, May.
  17. Linda N. Edwards & Elizabeth Field-Hendrey, 2002. "Home-Based Work and Women's Labor Force Decisions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(1), pages 170-200, January.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:msm:wpaper:2014/15. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Maud de By).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.