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Sources and Legitimacy of Financial Liberalization

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  • Brian Burgoon

    ()

  • Panicos O. Demetriades

    ()

  • Geoffrey R.D. Underhill

    ()

Abstract

This article seeks to clarify how we understand domestic and international sources of globalization and specifically how we explain financial liberalization across countries. The article also develops our understanding of the underlying legitimacy of financial liberalization. We debate e.g. Abiad and Mody (2005) and others who have found political factors to have little impact on financial openness. Using the same data undergirding such conclusions we argue, in contrast, that even a slight broadening of the political variables employed in the model and much closer attention to “input” and “output” aspects of the political legitimacy of financial liberalization over time reveal a more central role for politics in shaping liberalization. Input legitimacy involves the representation of stakeholders in initial and ongoing decisions to liberalize, while “output” legitimacy concerns liberalization’s distributional consequences and management thereof over time. Several empirical measures of domestic-national and international political factors plausibly influence such aspects of legitimacy and are found to play a significant role in shaping liberalization, suggesting legitimation politics to be more important to financial openness than existing studies have typically acknowledged.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of Leicester in its series Discussion Papers in Economics with number 11/45.

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Date of creation: Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:11/45

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Keywords: financial openness; liberalization dynamics; financial regulation; political legitimacy; political variables; financial reform;

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  1. Enrica Detragiache & Abdul Abiad & Thierry Tressel, 2008. "A New Database of Financial Reforms," IMF Working Papers 08/266, International Monetary Fund.
  2. Abdul Abiad & Ashoka Mody, 2005. "Financial Reform: What Shakes It? What Shapes It?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(1), pages 66-88, March.
  3. Lai, Yu-Bong, 2010. "The political economy of capital market integration and tax competition," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 475-487, December.
  4. Yongfu Huang, 2009. "The political economy of financial reform: are Abiad and Mody right?," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 24(7), pages 1207-1213.
  5. Ashoka Mody & Abdul Abiad, 2005. "Financial Reform," IMF Economic Issues 35, International Monetary Fund.
  6. Dani Rodrik, 1997. "Has Globalization Gone Too Far?," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 57.
  7. Philip Arestis & Panicos Demetriades, 1999. "Financial Liberalization: The Experience of Developing Countries," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 25(4), pages 441-457, Fall.
  8. Haggard, Stephan & Webb, Steven B, 1993. "What Do We Know about the Political Economy of Economic Policy Reform?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 8(2), pages 143-68, July.
  9. Anna Maria Mayda & Kevin H. O’Rourke & Richard Sinnott, 2007. "Risk, Government and Globalization: International Survey Evidence," Trinity Economics Papers tep0507, Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics.
  10. Bretschger, Lucas & Hettich, Frank, 2000. "Globalisation, capital mobility and tax competition: Theory and evidence for OECD countries," Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Diskussionspapiere 07/2000, Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Faculty of Law and Economics.
  11. Burgoon, Brian, 2001. "Globalization and Welfare Compensation: Disentangling the Ties that Bind," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(03), pages 509-551, June.
  12. Held, David, 1997. "Democracy and globalization," MPIfG Working Paper 97/5, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies.
  13. Hays, Jude C. & Ehrlich, Sean D. & Peinhardt, Clint, 2005. "Government Spending and Public Support for Trade in the OECD: An Empirical Test of the Embedded Liberalism Thesis," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 59(02), pages 473-494, April.
  14. Robert J. Franzese Jr. & Jude C. Hays, 2006. "Strategic Interaction among EU Governments in Active Labor Market Policy-making," European Union Politics, , vol. 7(2), pages 167-189, June.
  15. Bergh, Andreas & Nilsson, Therese, 2010. "Do liberalization and globalization increase income inequality?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 488-505, December.
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Cited by:
  1. Schuster, Philipp & Schmitt, Carina & Traub, Stefan, 2013. "The retreat of the state from entrepreneurial activities: A convergence analysis for OECD countries, 1980–2007," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 95-112.
  2. Jac Heckelman & Sandeep Mazumder, 2013. "Are we there yet? On the convergence of financial reforms," Economics of Governance, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 385-409, November.

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