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Risk, Government and Globalization: International Survey Evidence

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  • Anna Maria Mayda

    (Georgetown University)

  • Kevin H. O’Rourke

    ()
    (Department of Economics, Trinity College Dublin)

  • Richard Sinnott

    (University College Dublin)

Abstract

This paper uses international survey data to document two stylized facts. First, risk aversion is associated with anti-trade attitudes. Second, this effect is smaller in countries with greater levels of government expenditure. The paper thus provides evidence for the microeconomic underpinnings of the argument associated with Ruggie (1982), Rodrik (1998) and others that government spending can bolster support for globalization by reducing the risk associated with it in the minds of voters.

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File URL: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/TEP/2007/TEP0507.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Trinity College Dublin, Department of Economics in its series Trinity Economics Papers with number tep0507.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:tcd:tcduee:tep0507

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Postal: Trinity College, Dublin 2
Phone: (+ 353 1) 6081325
Fax: 6772503
Web page: http://www.tcd.ie/Economics/
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Keywords: Trade attitudes; risk;

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References

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  1. Alesina, Alberto & La Ferrara, Eliana, 2005. "Preferences for redistribution in the land of opportunities," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 897-931, June.
  2. Giovanni Facchini & Anna Maria Mayda, 2006. "Individual Attitudes towards Immigrants: Welfare-State Determinants across Countries," CESifo Working Paper Series 1768, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Christian Dustmann & Ian Preston, 2004. "Is Immigration Good or Bad for the Economy? Analysis of Attitudinal Responses," CReAM Discussion Paper Series 0406, Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), Department of Economics, University College London.
  4. James E. Rauch & Vitor Trindade, 2002. "Ethnic Chinese Networks In International Trade," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 84(1), pages 116-130, February.
  5. Mayda, Anna Maria & Rodrik, Dani, 2001. "Why are Some People (and Countries) More Protectionist than Others?," CEPR Discussion Papers 2960, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  6. Jens Hainmueller & Michael J. Hiscox, 2005. "Learning to Love Globalization? Education and Individual Attitudes Toward International Trade," International Trade 0505011, EconWPA.
  7. Gordon H. Hanson & Kenneth Scheve & Matthew J. Slaughter, 2007. "Public Finance And Individual Preferences Over Globalization Strategies," Economics and Politics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 1-33, 03.
  8. Hanson, Gordon H., 2005. "Why Does Immigration Divide America? Public Finance and Political Opposition to Open Borders," Peterson Institute Press: All Books, Peterson Institute for International Economics, number 4000, July.
  9. Dani Rodrik, 1996. "Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?," NBER Working Papers 5537, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Scheve, Kenneth F. & Slaughter, Matthew J., 2001. "What determines individual trade-policy preferences?," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(2), pages 267-292, August.
  11. Hays, Jude C. & Ehrlich, Sean D. & Peinhardt, Clint, 2005. "Government Spending and Public Support for Trade in the OECD: An Empirical Test of the Embedded Liberalism Thesis," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 59(02), pages 473-494, April.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Mayda, Anna Maria, 2007. "Why Are People More Pro-Trade than Pro-Migration?," IZA Discussion Papers 2855, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Giovanni Facchini & Tommaso Frattini & Cora Signorotto, 2013. "Mind What Your Voters Read: Media Exposure and International Economic Policy Making," Development Working Papers 358, Centro Studi Luca d\'Agliano, University of Milano.
  3. Bertola, Giuseppe, 2007. "Finance and welfare states in globalizing markets," CFS Working Paper Series 2007/31, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
  4. Bertola, Giuseppe & Lo Prete, Anna, 2008. "Openness, Financial Markets, and Policies: Cross-Country and Dynamic Patterns," CEPR Discussion Papers 7048, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  5. Brian Burgoon & Panicos O. Demetriades & Geoffrey R.D. Underhill, 2011. "Sources and Legitimacy of Financial Liberalization," Discussion Papers in Economics 11/45, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  6. Giuseppe Bertola, 2010. "Inequality, integration, and policy: issues and evidence from EMU," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 345-365, September.
  7. Naci Canpolat & Hüseyin Ozel, 2008. "Evolutionary Dynamics of Globalization," Working Papers 2008/16, Turkish Economic Association.

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