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Estimating the effect of adolescent fertility on educational attainment in Cape Town using a propensity score weighted regression

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  • Vimal Ranchhod

    ()
    (School of Economics, University of Cape Town)

  • David Lam

    ()
    (University of Michigan)

  • Murray Leibbrandt

    ()
    (SALDRU, School of Economics, University of Cape Town)

  • Leticia Marteleto

    (University of Texas at Austin.)

Abstract

We estimate the effect of a teenage birth on the educational attainment of young mothers in Cape Town, South Africa. Longitudinal and retrospective data on youth from the CAPS dataset are used. We control for a number of early life and pre-fertility characteristics. We also reweight our data using a propensity score matching process to generate a more appropriate counterfactual group. Accounting for respondent characteristics reduces estimates of the effect of a teen birth on dropping out of school, successfully completing secondary school, and years of schooling attained. Our best estimates of the effect of a teen birth on high school graduation by ages 20 and 22 are -5.9 and -2.7 percentage points respectively. The former is significant at the 5% level,while the latter is not statistically significant. Thus, there appears to be some `catching up' in educational attainment by teen mothers. We find only limited support for the hypothesis that there is heterogeneity in the effect of a teen birth, depending on the actual age of the first birth. By age 22, none of the estimates for high school graduation or years of schooling are statistically significant, regardless of the specific age at which the teen birth occurred. Despite this, we do find evidence that a teen birth does correlate with reduced educational expectations. The proportion of teen mothers who report an expected final educational attainment of high school graduation or greater is about 15 percentage points lower than the matched set of non-teen mothers, but this is not manifest amongst the girls whom we know will subsequently become teen mothers at some point after these expectations are measured.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town in its series SALDRU Working Papers with number 59.

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Length: 30 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ldr:wpaper:59

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  1. Arline Geronimus & Sanders Korenman, 1993. "The socioeconomic costs of teenage childbearing: Evidence and interpretation," Demography, Springer, vol. 30(2), pages 281-290, May.
  2. Ribar, D., 1991. "Teenage Fertility and High Scholl Completion," Papers 10-91-2, Pennsylvania State - Department of Economics.
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Cited by:
  1. Eva O. Arceo-Gómez & Raymundo M. Campos-Vázquez, 2011. "Teenage Pregnacy in Mexico: Evolution and Consequences," Working papers DTE 516, CIDE, División de Economía.
  2. Leticia Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2013. "Maternal age at first birth and adolescent education in Brazil," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(28), pages 793-820, April.
  3. Nicola Branson & Clare Hofmeyr & David Lam, 2013. "Progress through school and the determinants of school dropout in South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 100, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.
  4. Nicola Branson & Cally Ardington & Murray Leibbrandt, 2011. "Health outcomes for children born to teen mothers in Cape Town, South Africa," SALDRU Working Papers 55, Southern Africa Labour and Development Research Unit, University of Cape Town.

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