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The Schooling Costs of Teenage Out-of-Wedlock Childbearing: Analysis with a Within-School Propensity-Score-Matching Estimator

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Author Info

  • David I. Levine

    (Haas School of Business, University of California)

  • Gary Painter

    (School of Policy, Planning, and Development, University of Southern California)

Abstract

Teen out-of-wedlock mothers have lower education and earnings than do peers who have children later. This study uses the National Educational Longitudinal Survey of 1988 to examine the extent to which the apparent effects of out-of-wedlock teen childbearing are due to preexisting disadvantages of the young women and their families. We use a novel method that matches teen mothers to similar young women in their junior high school (that is, prior to pregnancy). We find that out-of-wedlock fertility reduces education substantially, although far less than the cross-sectional comparisons of means suggest. We further find that this effect is larger among those with lower probabilities of having a child out of wedlock. © 2003 President and Fellows of Harvard College and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by MIT Press in its journal Review of Economics and Statistics.

Volume (Year): 85 (2003)
Issue (Month): 4 (November)
Pages: 884-900

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Handle: RePEc:tpr:restat:v:85:y:2003:i:4:p:884-900

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Web page: http://mitpress.mit.edu/journals/

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Cited by:
  1. Melissa S. Kearney & Phillip B. Levine, 2007. "Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Early Childbearing," NBER Working Papers 13436, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Shirley H. Liu & Frank Heiland, 2007. "New Estimates on the Effect of Parental Separation on Child Health," Working Papers 0719, University of Miami, Department of Economics.
  3. Sudhanshu Handa & John Maluccio, 2008. "Matching the gold standard: Comparing experimental and non-experimental evaluation techniques for a geographically targeted program," Middlebury College Working Paper Series 0813, Middlebury College, Department of Economics.
  4. Zhao, Zhong, 2008. "Sensitivity of propensity score methods to the specifications," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 98(3), pages 309-319, March.
  5. Arceo-Gómez, Eva Olimpia & Campos-Vázquez, Raymundo M., 2011. "Teenage Pregnancy in Mexico: Evolution and Consequences," MPRA Paper 44532, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised Feb 2013.
  6. Kirdar, Murat G. & Dayioglu-Tayfur, Meltem & Koc, Ismet, 2011. "The Effect of Compulsory Schooling Laws on Teenage Marriage and Births in Turkey," IZA Discussion Papers 5887, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  7. Melissa Schettini Kearney & Phillip B. Levine, 2012. "Why is the Teen Birth Rate in the United States so High and Why Does it Matter?," NBER Working Papers 17965, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereaux & Kjell Salvanes, 2004. "Fast Times at Ridgemont High? The Effect of Compulsory Schooling Laws on Teenage Births," NBER Working Papers 10911, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Leticia Marteleto & Molly Dondero, 2013. "Maternal age at first birth and adolescent education in Brazil," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(28), pages 793-820, April.
  10. Rees, Daniel I. & Sabia, Joseph J., 2014. "The kid's speech: The effect of stuttering on human capital acquisition," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 76-88.
  11. Kruger, Diana & Berthelon, Matias & Navia, Rodrigo, 2009. "Adolescent Motherhood and Secondary Schooling in Chile," IZA Discussion Papers 4552, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Anna Sibilla Francesca DE PAOLI, 2010. "The effect of schooling on fertility, labor market participation and children?s outcomes, evidence from Ecuador," Departmental Working Papers 2010-30, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  13. Jennifer Kane & S. Morgan & Kathleen Harris & David Guilkey, 2013. "The Educational Consequences of Teen Childbearing," Demography, Springer, vol. 50(6), pages 2129-2150, December.
  14. Kevin Stange, 2011. "A Longitudinal Analysis of the Relationship Between Fertility Timing and Schooling," Demography, Springer, vol. 48(3), pages 931-956, August.

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