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Job polarization and jobless recoveries in Japan: Evidence from 1984 to 2010

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  • Yosuke Furukawa

    ()
    (Graduate School of Economics, Kyoto University)

  • Hiroki Toyoda

    ()
    (Graduate School of Economics, Kyoto University)

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    Abstract

    This study presents evidence for the existence of job polarization in Japan, identifies its effects across four age cohorts, and shows its relationship to Japan's business cycles during 1984-2010. The findings indicate that middle-skilled occupations decreased most sharply among the youngest workers. Our examination of the relationship between occupational categories and the business cycles demonstrates that job polarization is cyclical rather than gradual. Particularly, only employment in middle-skilled occupations did not recover after recessions. This finding underlies Japan's jobless recovery.

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    File URL: http://www.kier.kyoto-u.ac.jp/DP/DP874.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Kyoto University, Institute of Economic Research in its series KIER Working Papers with number 874.

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    Length: 11pages
    Date of creation: Jun 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:kyo:wpaper:874

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    Keywords: Jobless recoveries; job polarization; business cycles;

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    1. David Autor & Frank Levy & Richard Murnane, 2003. "The skill content of recent technological change: an empirical exploration," Proceedings, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, issue Nov.
    2. Fumio Hayashi & Edward C. Prescott, 2002. "Data Appendix to The 1990s in Japan: A Lost Decade," Technical Appendices hayashi02, Review of Economic Dynamics.
    3. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2003. "Lousy and lovely jobs: the rising polarization of work in Britain," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 20002, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Maarten Goos & Alan Manning, 2003. "Lousy and Lovely Jobs: the Rising Polarization of Work in Britain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0604, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. Fumio Hayashi & Edward C. Prescott, 2000. "The 1990s in Japan: a lost decade," Working Papers 607, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
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