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Ramadan school holidays as a natural experiment : impacts of seasonality on school dropout in Bangladesh

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  • Shonchoy, Abu S.
  • Ito, Seiro

Abstract

In 2000, Ramadan school vacation coincided with the original annual exam period of December in Bangladesh. This forced schools to pre-pone their final exam schedules in November, which was the month before the harvest begins. 'Ramadan 2000' is a natural experiment that reduced the labor demand for children during the exam period. Using household level panel data of 2000 and 2003, and after controlling for various unobservable variations including individual fixed effects, aggregate year effects, and subdistrict-level year effects, this paper finds evidence of statistically significant impact of seasonal labor demand on school dropout in Bangladesh among the children from agricultural households.

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File URL: http://ir.ide.go.jp/dspace/bitstream/2344/1084/1/ARRIDE_Discussion_No.295_shonchoy.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO) in its series IDE Discussion Papers with number 295.

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Date of creation: Apr 2011
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Publication status: Published in IDE Discussion Paper. No. 295. 2011.4
Handle: RePEc:jet:dpaper:dpaper295

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Related research

Keywords: Bangladesh; Child labor; Schools; Labor market; Drop out; Seasonal labor demand; School calendar;

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  1. Anne Case & Cally Ardington, 2006. "The impact of parental death on school outcomes: Longitudinal evidence from South Africa," Demography, Springer, vol. 43(3), pages 401-420, August.
  2. Cardoso, Ana Rute & Verner, Dorte, 2007. "School drop-out and push-out factors in Brazil : the role of early parenthood, child labor, and poverty," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4178, The World Bank.
  3. Kutor, Nick & Dunne, Mairead & Leach, Fiona & Chilisa, Bagele & Maundeni, Tapologo & Tabulawa, Richard & Forde, Linda Dzama & Asamoah, Alex, 2005. "Gendered School Experiences: The Impact on Retention and Achievement in Botswana and Ghana," Education Research Papers 12856, Department for International Development (DFID) (UK).
  4. Harold Alderman & Jere R. Behrman & Victor Lavy & Rekha Menon, 2001. "Child Health and School Enrollment: A Longitudinal Analysis," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(1), pages 185-205.
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