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Job Tasks, Computer Use, and the Decreasing Part-Time Pay Penalty for Women in the UK

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Author Info

  • Elsayed, Ahmed

    ()
    (ROA, Maastricht University)

  • de Grip, Andries

    ()
    (ROA, Maastricht University)

  • Fouarge, Didier

    ()
    (ROA, Maastricht University)

Abstract

Using data from the UK Skills Surveys, we show that the part-time pay penalty for female workers within low- and medium-skilled occupations decreased significantly over the period 1997-2006. The convergence in computer use between part-time and full-time workers within these occupations explains a large share of the decrease in the part-time pay penalty. However, the lower part-time pay penalty is also related to lower wage returns to reading and writing which are performed more intensively by full-time workers. Conversely, the increasing returns to influencing has increased the part-time pay penalty despite the convergence in the influencing task input between part-time and full-time workers. The relative changes in the input and prices of computer use and job tasks together explain more than 50 percent of the decrease in the part-time pay penalty.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 8069.

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Length: 33 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2014
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp8069

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Keywords: part-time work; pay penalty; job tasks; computer use;

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  1. Booth, Alison L. & van Ours, Jan C., 2010. "Part-Time Jobs: What Women Want?," IZA Discussion Papers 4686, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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  14. Elias, Peter & McKnight, Abigail, 2001. "Skill Measurement in Official Statistics: Recent Developments in the UK and the Rest of Europe," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(3), pages 508-40, July.
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