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What determines the part-time and gender earnings gaps in Britain: evidence from the workplace

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  • Karen Mumford
  • Peter N. Smith

Abstract

This study examines the role of individual and workplace characteristics in accounting for differences in hourly earnings between men and women in full and part-time jobs in Britain. A four-way gender-working time split (male full-timers, male part-timers, female full-timers, and female part-timers) is analysed, and allowance is explicitly made for workplace and occupational female segregation. Within gender groups, the striking difference between full and part-time employees is that full-timers work in higher paying occupations than do part-timers. Also, female occupational segregation makes a significant contribution to the earnings gap between male and female part-time employees but not for full-time workers. A further new result is that female workplace segregation contributes significantly to the full/part-time earnings gap of both males and females. Part-time employees work in more feminized workplaces and their earnings are lower. There remains, moreover, a substantial residual gender earnings gap between male and female employees. Copyright 2009 , Oxford University Press.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/oep/gpn041
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Oxford University Press in its journal Oxford Economic Papers.

Volume (Year): 61 (2009)
Issue (Month): suppl_1 (April)
Pages: i56-i75

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Handle: RePEc:oup:oxecpp:v:61:y:2009:i:suppl_1:p:i56-i75

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Cited by:
  1. Chzhen, Yekaterina & Mumford, Karen, 2011. "Gender gaps across the earnings distribution for full-time employees in Britain: Allowing for sample selection," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(6), pages 837-844.
  2. Gerry H. Makepeace & Michael J. Peel, 2013. "Combining information from Heckman and matching estimators: testing and controlling for hidden bias," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 33(3), pages 2422-2436.
  3. Fouarge D. & Grip A. de & Elsayed A.E.A., 2014. "Job tasks, computer use, and the decreasing part-time pay penalty for women in the UK," ROA Research Memorandum 003, Maastricht University, Research Centre for Education and the Labour Market (ROA).
  4. Yekaterina Chzhen & Karen Mumford, . "Gender Gaps Across the Earnings Distribution in Britain: Are Women Bossy Enough?," Discussion Papers 09/27, Department of Economics, University of York.
  5. Card, David & Cardoso, Ana Rute & Kline, Patrick, 2013. "Bargaining and the Gender Wage Gap: A Direct Assessment," IZA Discussion Papers 7592, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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