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Long-Run Effects of Gestation During the Dutch Hunger Winter Famine on Labor Market and Hospitalization Outcomes

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Author Info

  • Scholte, Robert

    ()
    (SEO Economic Research)

  • van den Berg, Gerard J.

    ()
    (University of Mannheim)

  • Lindeboom, Maarten

    ()
    (VU University Amsterdam)

Abstract

The Dutch Hunger Winter (1944/45) is the most-studied famine in the literature on long-run effects of malnutrition in utero. Its temporal and spatial demarcations are clear, it was severe, it was not anticipated, and nutritional conditions in society were favorable and stable before and after the famine. This is the first study to analyze effects of in utero exposure on labor market outcomes and hospitalization, and the first to use register data covering the full Dutch population to examine long-run effects of this famine. We provide results of famine exposure by sub-interval of gestation. We find a significantly negative effect of exposure during the first trimester of gestation on employment outcomes 53 or more years after birth. Hospitalization rates in the years before retirement are higher after middle or late gestational exposure.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6307.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: Jan 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6307

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Keywords: morbidity; developmental origins; ageing; nutrition; income; health; employment;

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  1. Neelsen, Sven & Stratmann, Thomas, 2011. "Effects of prenatal and early life malnutrition: Evidence from the Greek famine," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 479-488, May.
  2. van den Berg, Gerard J. & Deeg, Dorly J. H. & Lindeboom, Maarten & Portrait, France, 2010. "The Role of Early-Life Conditions in the Cognitive Decline due to Adverse Events Later in Life," IZA Discussion Papers 4780, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Chen, Yuyu & Zhou, Li-An, 2007. "The long-term health and economic consequences of the 1959-1961 famine in China," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 26(4), pages 659-681, July.
  4. Xin Meng & Nancy Qian, 2009. "The Long Term Consequences of Famine on Survivors: Evidence from a Unique Natural Experiment using China's Great Famine," NBER Working Papers 14917, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Douglas Almond & Lena Edlund & Hongbin Li & Junsen Zhang, 2007. "Long-Term Effects Of The 1959-1961 China Famine: Mainland China and Hong Kong," NBER Working Papers 13384, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Douglas Almond & Bhashkar Mazumder, 2011. "Health Capital and the Prenatal Environment: The Effect of Ramadan Observance during Pregnancy," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 3(4), pages 56-85, October.
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Cited by:
  1. Black, Sandra E. & Devereux, Paul J. & Salvanes, Kjell G., 2014. "Does grief transfer across generations? In-utero deaths and child outcomes," Discussion Paper Series in Economics 23/2014, Department of Economics, Norwegian School of Economics.
  2. J├╝rges, Hendrik, 2013. "Collateral damage: The German food crisis, educational attainment and labor market outcomes of German post-war cohorts," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(1), pages 286-303.

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