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The Long Term Consequences of Famine on Survivors: Evidence from a Unique Natural Experiment using China's Great Famine

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  • Xin Meng
  • Nancy Qian

Abstract

This paper estimates the long run impact of famine on survivors in the context of China’s Great Famine. To address problems of measurement error of famine exposure and potential endogeneity of famine intensity, we exploit a novel source of variation in regional intensity of famine derived from the unique institutional determinants of the Great Famine. To address attenuation bias caused by selection for survival, we estimate the impact on the upper quantiles of the distribution of outcomes. Our results indicate that in-utero and early childhood exposure to famine had large negative effects on adult height, weight, weight-for-height, educational attainment and labor supply.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 14917.

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Date of creation: Apr 2009
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:14917

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