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The Relative Importance of Local Labour Market Conditions and Pupil Attainment on Post-Compulsory Schooling Decisions

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Author Info

  • Meschi, Elena

    ()
    (Università Ca’ Foscari di Venezia)

  • Swaffield, Joanna K.

    ()
    (University of York)

  • Vignoles, Anna

    ()
    (University of Cambridge)

Abstract

This paper assesses the relative importance of local labour market conditions and pupil educational attainment as primary determinants of the post-compulsory schooling decision. Using a nested logit model we formally incorporate the structured and sequential decision process pupils engage with. Our findings show that, on average, the key drivers of the schooling decision are pupil educational attainment and parental aspirations rather than local labour market conditions. However, there is some evidence that higher local unemployment rates encourage males to invest in education, and that interactions with educational attainment suggest local labour market conditions impact heterogeneously across the pupil population.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6143.

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Length: 50 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6143

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Related research

Keywords: post-compulsory education; local labour markets; parental aspirations; educational attainment; nested logit;

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References

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  1. Jonathan Wadsworth, 2009. "Minimum Wages," The Economic Record, The Economic Society of Australia, The Economic Society of Australia, vol. 85(271), pages 491-492, December.
  2. Adam Briggs & Simon Burgess & Deborah Wilson, 2006. "The Dynamics of School Attainment of Englands Ethnic Minorities," CASE Papers, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE case105, Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion, LSE.
  3. Charles T. Clotfelter & Michael Rothschild, 1993. "Studies of Supply and Demand in Higher Education," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number clot93-1.
  4. Victor Lavy & Analía Schlosser, 2007. "Mechanisms and Impacts of Gender Peer Effects at School," NBER Working Papers 13292, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Micklewright, John & Pearson, Mark & Smith, Stephen, 1990. "Unemployment and Early School Leaving," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(400), pages 163-69, Supplemen.
  6. Cameron,A. Colin & Trivedi,Pravin K., 2005. "Microeconometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521848053.
  7. McVicar, Duncan & Rice, Patricia, 2000. "Participation in further education in England and Wales: an analysis of post-war trends," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton 0014, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
  8. Martyn Andrews & Steve Bradley, . "Modelling the Transition from School and the Demand for Training in the UK (creed)," Working Papers, Department of Economics, University of Lancaster ec1/95, Department of Economics, University of Lancaster.
  9. Lorraine Dearden & Carl Emmerson & Costas Meghir, 2009. "Conditional Cash Transfers and School Dropout Rates," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 44(4).
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Alberto Tumino, 2013. "The effect of local labour market conditions on educational choices: a cross country comparison," ImPRovE Working Papers, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp 13/06, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
  2. Alessandra Casarico & Paola Profeta & Chiara Pronzato, 2012. "On the local labor market determinants of female university enrolment in European regions," Carlo Alberto Notebooks, Collegio Carlo Alberto 278, Collegio Carlo Alberto.
  3. Rampino, Tina & Taylor, Mark P., 2012. "Educational aspirations and attitudes over the business cycle," ISER Working Paper Series 2012-26, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  4. Taylor, Mark P., 2013. "The labour market impacts of leaving education when unemployment is high: evidence from Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2013-12, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  5. Paolo Lucchino & Dr Richard Dorsett, 2013. "Visualising the school-to-work transition: an analysis using optimal matching," NIESR Discussion Papers, National Institute of Economic and Social Research 11615, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  6. Marc van der Steeg & Roel van Elk & Dinand Webbink, 2012. "Does intensive coaching reduce school dropout?," CPB Discussion Paper, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis 224, CPB Netherlands Bureau for Economic Policy Analysis.

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