Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Participation in further education in England and Wales: an analysis of post-war trends

Contents:

Author Info

  • McVicar, Duncan
  • Rice, Patricia

Abstract

The paper examines the time-series evidence relating to participation rates in further education in England and Wales, and uses cointegration analysis to identify a long-run statistical relationship in the data consistent with an augmented human-capital model. The recent rapid growth of participation is attributable largely to the improvements in GCSE attainment of the last decade, coupled with the expansion of higher education. Fluctuations in labour demand play a significant role in determining movements in participation rates over time, and the substantial rise in youth unemployment of the early notes was a contributed to the rapid growth of participation at this time. Keywords; human capital, participation in further education, cointegration analysis

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/33115/1/0014.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton in its series Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics with number 0014.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 01 Jan 2000
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:stn:sotoec:0014

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ
Phone: (+44) 23 80592537
Fax: (+44) 23 80593858
Email:
Web page: http://www.economics.soton.ac.uk/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. repec:ese:iserwp:2012-26 is not listed on IDEAS
  2. Wasmer, Etienne, 1998. "Labor Supply Dynamics, Unemployment and Human Capital Investments," Seminar Papers, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies 651, Stockholm University, Institute for International Economic Studies.
  3. Flannery, Darragh & O’Donoghue, Cathal, 2013. "The demand for higher education: A static structural approach accounting for individual heterogeneity and nesting patterns," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 243-257.
  4. Pastore, Francesco, 2005. "To Study or to Work? Education and Labour Market Participation of Young People in Poland," IZA Discussion Papers 1793, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Philip Wales, 2011. "‘Geography or Economics? A micro-level analysis of the determinants of degree choice in the context of regional economic disparities in the UK’," ERSA conference papers ersa10p1046, European Regional Science Association.
  6. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-15 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Paolo Lucchino & Dr Richard Dorsett, 2013. "Visualising the school-to-work transition: an analysis using optimal matching," NIESR Discussion Papers, National Institute of Economic and Social Research 11615, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  8. Nattavudh Powdthavee & Anna Vignoles, 2006. "Using Rate of Return Analyses to Understand Sector Skill Needs," CEE Discussion Papers, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE 0070, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  9. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-12 is not listed on IDEAS
  10. Rice, P., 2002. "The great divide: regional differences in education and training," Discussion Paper Series In Economics And Econometrics, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton 0201, Economics Division, School of Social Sciences, University of Southampton.
  11. Meschi, Elena & Swaffield, Joanna K. & Vignoles, Anna, 2011. "The Relative Importance of Local Labour Market Conditions and Pupil Attainment on Post-Compulsory Schooling Decisions," IZA Discussion Papers 6143, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Peter Dolton & Li Lin, 2011. "From Grants to Loans and Fees: The Demand for Post-Compulsory Education in England and Wales from 1955 to 2008," CEE Discussion Papers, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE 0127, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE.
  13. Philip Wales, 2010. "Geography or economics? A micro-level analysis of the determinants of degree choice in the context of regional economic disparities in the UK," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library 33550, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:stn:sotoec:0014. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Chris Thorn).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.