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Migration, Transfers and Child Labor

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  • Dimova, Ralitza

    ()
    (University of Manchester)

  • Epstein, Gil S.

    ()
    (Bar-Ilan University)

  • Gang, Ira N.

    ()
    (Rutgers University)

Abstract

We examine agricultural child labor in the context of emigration, transfers, and the ability to hire outside labor. We start by developing a theoretical background based on Basu and Van, (1998), Basu, (1999) and Epstein and Kahana (2008) and show how hiring labor from outside the household and transfers to the household might induce a reduction in children’s working hours. Analysis using Living Standards Measurement Survey (LSMS) data on the Kagera region in Tanzania lend support to the hypothesis that both emigration and remittances reduce child labor.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 5641.

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Length: 20 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5641

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Keywords: child labor; emigration; transfers; Tanzania;

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References

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  1. Eric V. Edmonds, 2007. "Child Labor," NBER Working Papers 12926, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  2. Marigee P. Bacolod & Priya Ranjan, 2008. "Why Children Work, Attend School, or Stay Idle: The Roles of Ability and Household Wealth," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 56, pages 791-828.
  3. Basu, Kaushik & Van, Pham Hoang, 1998. "The Economics of Child Labor," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 88(3), pages 412-27, June.
  4. Beegle, Kathleen & Dehejia, Rajeev H. & Gatti, Roberta & Krutikova, Sofya, 2008. "The consequences of child labor : evidence from longitudinal data in rural Tanzania," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4677, The World Bank.
  5. Epstein, Gil S. & Kahana, Nava, 2008. "Child labor and temporary emigration," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 99(3), pages 545-548, June.
  6. Bhalotra, Sonia & Heady, Christopher, 2001. "Child farm labour : the wealth paradox," Social Protection Discussion Papers 24088, The World Bank.
  7. Ranjan, Priya, 2001. "Credit constraints and the phenomenon of child labor," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 81-102, February.
  8. Robert E. B. Lucas, 1994. "Internal Migration in Developing Countries," Boston University - Institute for Economic Development, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development 43, Boston University, Institute for Economic Development.
  9. Ranjan, Priya, 1999. "An economic analysis of child labor," Economics Letters, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 64(1), pages 99-105, July.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Bouoiyour, Jamal & Miftah, Amal, 2014. "Education, Genre et Transferts de fonds des migrants: Quelles interactions dans le Maroc rural ?
    [Education, Gender and Remittances: What interactions in rural Morocco?]
    ," MPRA Paper 57051, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  2. Ebeke, Christian Hubert, 2012. "The power of remittances on the international prevalence of child labor," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 23(4), pages 452-462.
  3. Jamal BOUOIYOUR & Amal MIFTAH, 2013. "Transferts de fonds, éducation et travail des enfants au Maroc. Une analyse par score de propension," Working Papers 2012-2013_5, CATT - UPPA - Université de Pau et des Pays de l'Adour, revised Apr 2013.
  4. Jamal Bouoiyour & Amal Miftah, 2014. "Household Welfare, International Migration And Children Time Allocation In Rural Morocco," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 39(2), pages 75-95, June.
  5. repec:laf:wpaper:201105 is not listed on IDEAS

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