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BMI Changes in Russian Adults: The Role of Health Related Behaviors and Spousal Relationships

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  • Huffman, Sonya K.

Abstract

The paper investigates the effects of changes in marital status and health related behaviors (smoking and drinking) on the body mass index (BMI) in Russian adults over a ten-year period. Smoking and drinking behavior changes have played an important part in health status changes over 1994 to 2004. The results indicate that the individual weight/BMI changes asymmetrically in health determinants; the sign and the magnitude of the response are different depending on the starting point and whether there is an increase or a decrease in the explanatory variable. Males’ BMI decreases with smoking and increases with quitting smoking, but females’ BMI increases with drinking alcohol and decreases with stopping drinking. Losing a partner decreases only the females’ BMI, but gaining a spouse/partner is associated with increases in BMI for both genders. For married females and males, the change in spousal BMI is significantly positively related. Understanding interactions between individual health-related behaviors and the set of determinants that contribute to such behaviors is a fundamental step in the design of effective interventions.

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File URL: http://www.econ.iastate.edu/sites/default/files/publications/papers/p15987-2013-03-06.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Iowa State University, Department of Economics in its series Staff General Research Papers with number 35987.

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Date of creation: 06 Mar 2013
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Handle: RePEc:isu:genres:35987

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Postal: Iowa State University, Dept. of Economics, 260 Heady Hall, Ames, IA 50011-1070
Phone: +1 515.294.6741
Fax: +1 515.294.0221
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Web page: http://www.econ.iastate.edu
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Keywords: BMI; Russia; health related behaviors; asymmetric response;

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References

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  1. Darius Lakdawalla & Tomas Philipson & Jay Bhattacharya, 2005. "Welfare-Enhancing Technological Change and the Growth of Obesity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(2), pages 253-257, May.
  2. Huffman, Sonya Kostova & Rizov, Marian, 2009. "The Rise of Obesity in Transition: Theory and Empirical Evidence from Russia," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 49972, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  3. Huffman, Wallace E. & Huffman, Sonya Kostova & Tegene, Abebayehu & Rickertsen, Kyrre, 2006. "The Economics of Obesity-Related Mortality among High Income Countries," 2006 Annual Meeting, August 12-18, 2006, Queensland, Australia 25567, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  4. Kalediene, Ramune & Petrauskiene, Jadvyga, 2004. "Socio-economic transition, inequality, and mortality in Lithuania," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 2(1), pages 87-95, March.
  5. Inas Rashad & Michael Grossman & Shin-Yi Chou, 2006. "The Super Size of America: An Economic Estimation of Body Mass Index and Obesity in Adults," Eastern Economic Journal, Eastern Economic Association, vol. 32(1), pages 133-148, Winter.
  6. Cohen-Cole, Ethan & Fletcher, Jason M., 2008. "Is obesity contagious? Social networks vs. environmental factors in the obesity epidemic," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1382-1387, September.
  7. Zohoori, Namvar & Mroz, Thomas A. & Popkin, Barry & Glinskaya, Elena & Lokshin, Michael & Mancini, Dominic & Kozyreva, Polina & Kosolapov, Mikhail & Swafford, Michael, 1998. "Monitoring the economic transition in the Russian Federation and its implications for the demographic crisis -- the Russian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 26(11), pages 1977-1993, November.
  8. Palosuo, Hannele, 2000. "Health-related lifestyles and alienation in Moscow and Helsinki," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 51(9), pages 1325-1341, November.
  9. Shin-Yi Chou & Michael Grossman & Henry Saffer, 2002. "An Economic Analysis of Adult Obesity: Results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," NBER Working Papers 9247, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Cockerham, William C., 2000. "Health lifestyles in Russia," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 51(9), pages 1313-1324, November.
  11. Staudigel, Matthias, 2011. "How (much) do food prices contribute to obesity in Russia?," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 9(2), pages 133-147, March.
  12. Huffman, Sonya K. & Rizov, Marian, 2007. "Determinants of obesity in transition economies: The case of Russia," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 5(3), pages 379-391, December.
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