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The effect of the number of siblings on education in sub-Saharan Africa: evidence from a natural experiment

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Author Info

  • KUEPIE Mathias
  • TENIKUE Michel

Abstract

The objective of this paper is to investigate the effect of the number of siblings on education in urban sub-Saharan Africa. The birth of twins is considered as a natural experiment that affects the number of siblings but has no direct effect on education. This event is used as instrumental variable in a two-stage least-squared estimation approach to investigate the causal effect of the number of siblings on school achievement. Equations are estimated on subsamples of singleton children born before the twins. The results show that an exogenous fertility increase significantly inhibits human capital accumulation. However, the magnitude of the marginal effect seems small: one additional sibling decreases the total number of school grade by nearly one-tenth. In a context of high fertility, the total effect might become very detrimental.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by CEPS/INSTEAD in its series CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series with number 2012-28.

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Length: 28 pages
Date of creation: Jun 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:irs:cepswp:2012-28

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Keywords: education; fertility; twins; sub-Saharan Africa;

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References

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  1. Emerson, Patrick M. & Souza, André Portela, 2008. "Birth Order, Child Labor, and School Attendance in Brazil," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(9), pages 1647-1664, September.
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  5. Eric Edmonds, 2006. "Understanding sibling differences in child labor," Journal of Population Economics, Springer, vol. 19(4), pages 795-821, October.
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  7. Becker, Gary S & Lewis, H Gregg, 1973. "On the Interaction between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 81(2), pages S279-88, Part II, .
  8. Goux, Dominique & Maurin, Eric, 2005. "The effect of overcrowded housing on children's performance at school," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 89(5-6), pages 797-819, June.
  9. Parfait Eloundou-Enyegue & Lindy Williams, 2006. "Family size and schooling in sub-Saharan African settings: A reexamination," Demography, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 25-52, February.
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  12. Joshua Angrist & Victor Lavy & Analia Schlosser, 2010. "Multiple Experiments for the Causal Link between the Quantity and Quality of Children," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 28(4), pages 773-824, October.
  13. Jean-Marie Baland & James A. Robinson, 2000. "Is Child Labor Inefficient?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 108(4), pages 663-679, August.
  14. Judith Blake, 1981. "Family size and the quality of children," Demography, Springer, vol. 18(4), pages 421-442, November.
  15. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2005. "The More the Merrier? The Effect of Family Size and Birth Order on Children's Education," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 120(2), pages 669-700, May.
  16. Michel Tenikue & Bertrand Verheyden, 2010. "Birth Order and Schooling: Theory and Evidence from Twelve Sub-Saharan Countries," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 19(4), pages 459-495, August.
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Cited by:
  1. KUEPIE Mathias & SAIDOU HAMADOU Théophile, 2013. "The impact of fertility on household economic status in Cameroon, Mali and Senegal," CEPS/INSTEAD Working Paper Series 2013-20, CEPS/INSTEAD.

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